R.I.P. Carrie Fisher

Just when we thought we were in the clear, the evil gods behind 2016 pulled the rug from under us and laughed. So if you haven’t heard by now, actress and philanthropist Carrie Fisher died on December 27 of cardiac arrest. There had been conflicting reports of her status in the days leading up to it. She had been hospitalized, following a heart problem on an airplane, and then the diagnosis stated that she had been put into stable condition. But 2 mornings ago, I learned that those rumors of her pulling through were examples of false hope. And so now, I take my time to reflect my thoughts on this terrible tragedy for Star Wars fans. “But, Cade, you still have a bunch of movies from 2016 you haven’t reviewed yet. You need to get on those, pronto!” Stop that noise. Those movies will have their time to shine when it comes down to it. I literally dropped EVERYTHING else that I’m working on to bring you the feelings I’m going through in the wake of Carrie Fisher’s death. If by chance, you don’t know have the slightest clue Fisher is or who she’s played in her career, that’s weird but I’ll explain. It was this little movie franchise called Star Wars. Who did she play? Princess Leia Organa of the planet Alderaan, leader of the Rebel Alliance, and feminist icon for generations. Okay, confession time. I did have a little celebrity crush on her when I was but a child, especially after Return of Jedi. As adolescence wore on, I matured as a person and found there were other things worth getting invested in rather than what actor or actress you have a crush on. However, her personal life story is arguably even more fascinating than her professional one. The first daughter of actors and singers Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher, she spent much of her adult life suffering from bipolar disorder. She wished to cope this with severe episodes of drug addiction and alcoholism. In fact, it’s believed that she may have been stoned for a good chunk of filming The Empire Strikes Back. She spent her subsequent years as a novelist, play-write, and activist in rehabilitation and female power. So if anyone on Earth could survive a heart attack, it had to be her. Just goes to show that you can’t always get what you want. Funnily enough, her mother passed away a day later, supposedly from grief. Like mother, like daughter. Fisher’s death also has me wondering about the implications of Leia’s role in the next few Star Wars movies. It’s been confirmed that she has completed work on Episode VIII, which she may have a larger role in than The Force Awakens. But that still leaves the question open to what her character’s fate will be in Episode XI. Will she be written out like Spock Prime and Pavel Chekov in Star Trek Beyond? If so, they would have to include deeply emotional tributes to her, like we saw this past summer. Then again, they could potentially go the path that Rogue One took? (Spoiler Alert) In Rogue One, Grand Moff Tarkin and young Princess Leia were recreated with different actors, but their faces were digitally structured to look like them through the use of CGI. That’s been the biggest point of contention for this year’s entry in the series, and there’s speculation that Lucasfilm might use that strategy in the future. I could imagine the fans in an uproar at that prospect, but we’ll have to wait until Kathleen Kennedy says anything. I’m willing to bet my money, however, that they’ll wait a few years to announce a coming-of-age movie starring young Leia, a la Han Solo. In any case, those are my thoughts on this whole ordeal. When I discovered the news, I screamed out my frustration and sadness. What a way to cap off a year chock full of celebrity deaths. Rest in peace, Carrie Fisher. You will be missed in the future. Thanks for everything.

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