“Iron Fist” T.V. Show Review

This was bound to happen. I knew it, you knew it, we all knew it was coming- we just weren’t sure it would be this far. Marvel Entertainment has finally released their first true stinker. This supernatural comic-book superhero television series released all 13 episodes of its first season on March 17th, 2017. The final solo series in the lead up to the Marvel/Netflix crossover event The Defenders, it thus far remains one of the online network’s most-watched original series., if not critically successful. Set against the backdrop of Upper Manhattan, the show focuses on Danny Rand, a young billionaire who returns after being presumed dead for about 15 years to reclaim his parents’ enormous company. What did he do that entire time, many characters ask? He was adopted by Buddhist monks who taught him the ways of kung-fu and how to use the power of an ancient force known as the Iron Fist to fight against the evil organization known as The Hand. Now he has come back to New York to reunite with his childhood friends, the Meachums, and hopefully continue his campaign of defending his people. Alright, let’s get this out of the way right now before you make a decision to watch it: Iron Fist is not a good show. Firstly, the main character of Danny Rand is not very compelling or interesting. Contrary to popular belief, he was not actually whitewashed with the casting of Finn Jones, as he was a white man in the comics, to begin with. But even if that were a problem, then that would be the absolute last thing wrong with the show. No, Finn Jones is just unfit to carry this show on his shoulders, coming off as annoying and bland as the titular hero. Previously, he had been excellent in his small but memorable role as the Prince of Flowers in Game of Thrones, so what happened? I don’t blame him, considering the fact that his backstory is super lame. In all fairness, though, I will give it to both Jessica Henwick as Colleen Wing and Tom Pelphrey as Edward Meachum. They were clearly the most interesting characters all season, and really did the best they could with the limited material that was given. Henwick elevated herself above the stereotypical superhero love interest as a badass martial arts teacher, while Pelphrey was an unpredictable billionaire with a bad drug habit. Meanwhile, Rosario Dawson, Wai Ching Ho and Carrie Anne Moss reprise their roles as Claire Temple, Madam Gao and Jeri Hogarth, respectively, from the previous Marvel/Netflix shows. The three of them did a respectable job, despite their criminally limited screen-time. Other cast members include Jessica Stroup, Ramon Rodriguez, Sacha Dhawan, and Lord of the Rings alumni David Wenham. No matter how much they all try, none of them are able to escape the character archetypes you expect them to be. Leading into my next point, Iron Fist is absurdly predictable at every turn. One of the things that made shows like Jessica Jones and Daredevil so compelling was the fact that the storylines were extremely well-written and smart. I couldn’t have predicted many things that played out over the seasons. But here, I called out every single major plot point and piece of character development from the first two episodes alone, and I was right on all counts. Speaking of the first two episodes, they’re just awful. The time it takes to set up the whole story of the season is dreadfully pompous and frustratingly boring. None of the main characters are likable at the beginning, when you’re supposed to start caring about them and getting invested in them. However, to the show’s credit, the next couple of episodes were entertaining. Especially in the sixth, when we’re getting an idea of the threat that Danny Rand is facing off against: The Hand. And as soon as they came into the picture, this show picked the fuck up, and I started having some fun. It was at this point that I was starting to get won over after all my initial complaints… but then the last three episodes came. That’s when the writers lost themselves and just slapped together an ending that feels like a completely different show than what started out. In fact, easily the largest flaw with this show is that it’s completely confused in the tone and genre. You’d think that with the Marvel name slapped in front, it’d be an exciting superhero action story. But the fights are often underwhelming and it instead focuses on the melodrama of a rich family in Manhattan. So then, it’s got to be an engaging soap opera, right? But then, it also focuses a lot of the story on board meetings and business litigation in Rand Enterprise. So it tries to be some sort of socially relevant commentary on corporate greed and corruption, even though our hero is the heir to a billion-dollar company. This series has no idea on what it actually wants to be about that it compromises everything else in the process. Here’s the main purpose of Iron Fist: It can’t stand on its own because it’s too weak. It establishes the big picture and what the problem is, and what they’re fighting in The Defenders. It pains me to say, but Iron Fist is a frustrating hodgepodge of conflicting ideas. Though they do come together to occasionally provide some fleeting enjoyment, this is not a show worth more than one marathon, as I finished it in two days.

Image result for iron fist netflix

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