“IT” Movie Review

In the universe of this story, Pennywise makes a reappearance every 27 years. This new big-screen adaptation comes to us exactly 27 years after the original T.V. miniseries. Is that purely an incredible coincidence? Or is something larger at play happening? Who knows. This coming-of-age horror thriller from Mama director Andy Muschietti released worldwide on September 8th, 2017. Following a record-breaking Thursday night preview proceeds for an R-rated film, the film has grossed over $117 million and was the most pre-ordered horror movie ticket of all time according to Fandango. Originally announced in 2009, Beasts of No Nation helmer Cary Fukanaga was all set to take on this new adaptation. But something happened, the deal fell through and they pretty much had to start over from scratch. Adapted from the first half of Stephen King’s novel, the story takes place in the fictional town of Derry, Maine. A group of friendly outsiders known as the Losers Club starts noticing that children are disappearing all over town. They soon realize that it has something to do with a demonic entity known as Pennywise the Dancing Clown. With no help from the adults, they must take down Pennywise and face their own demons in the process. Confession time: I don’t like the 1990 miniseries starring Tim Curry. He is great, but it never scared me and the second half of the series was downright awful. And having read the massive book by King prior to this film’s release, I was very skeptical. Especially with the film’s troubled history, which included the swap of directors and stars. But I became more optimistic as the trailers started appearing. And not only is IT far better than I expected, it may also be one of the author’s best adaptations to date. The reason why Stephen King is one of my all-time favorite authors is that he never forgets to emphasize the human element inhabiting the characters and story. Whether it’s psychological torment or physical growth, he knows how to develop people. Thankfully, Muschietti understands this important trait and gives each of the Losers a distinct personality. In the first 30 minutes, we learn everything we need to know about them and the struggles they deal with on a day-to-day basis. In a way, you can emphasize with everyone as you see their lives unfold. Even the school bully, played terrifically by Nicholas Hamilton, is given depths as we see his emotionally troubling home life. And the cherry on top? All the kids here talk and curse like actual kids. It’s not squeaky clean and sometimes leads to some really funny moments. As the stuttering leader of the Club, Jaeden Lieberher is quickly becoming one of the top child actors of his generation. In the same vein as his performance last year in the vastly overlooked Midnight Special, he is much smarter and more capable than his meager outlook would suggest. Continuing his string of horror roles for children, Stranger Things star Finn Wolfhard is perfect as the comic relief. He delivers, hands down, the funniest lines in the entire movie; a couple of times, the whole theater was roaring at the things he said. Newcomers Wyatt Oleff, Chosen Jacobs, Jack Dylan Grazer, and Jeremy Ray Taylor portray the rest of the Losers and each stand out for one reason or another. Meanwhile, the lone girl is Beverly Marsh, played by Sophia Lillis, who evokes both the looks and chops of a teenage Amy Adams. When we’re shown glimpses of her terrible home life, it becomes apparent that she isn’t the whore her classmates make her out to be. As someone who has met girls like that, I understood her struggles. One of the many things that set IT apart from most other modern horror films is just how well-produced everything is from a technical standpoint. Chung-hoon Chung’s cinematography makes the film lovely to look at. At once, he tributes classics with several sequences of Steadicam. At other times, the camera is following the characters handheld but never gets shaky and hard-to-follow. This is especially thanks to the outstanding editing by Jason Ballantine, who did similar work on 2015’s Mad Max: Fury Road. There are just enough cuts in each scene so that you can get the horror present while leaving some things to the imagination. Benjamin Wallfisch composes the musical score, his 4th one for a horror in just over a year. While yes, there are many tracks with strings, it doesn’t just consist of manipulative jolts saved for a cheap jump scare. He mixes strings with subtle percussion and low-voiced choirs, evoking something out of Danny Elfman or the Harry Potter films. It often trades intense orchestrations with softer melodies for the character-driven moments. It’s not overly sentimental music and earns an emotional response from the audience just through small guitars and wind instruments. And as for Bill Skarsgard as Pennywise the Dancing Clown in the new IT? No taking this back, but he completely blows Tim Curry out of the water. His eyes are often glowing and look askew, giving him this otherworldly presence. They were going to use CGI for that, but Skarsgard could actually separate his eyes. He also supposedly worked with a contortionist to perfect some of the character’s crazy movements. His voice is playful at first but soon drops to a menacing monotone. Some of the CGI edited around his body, especially near the end, was a little weird. But for the most part, the makeup and CGI were seamlessly blended, coming together to create one of the greatest villains in the history of horror fiction. Another thing of note: Stephen King isn’t afraid to kill children, and the movie never holds back its R-rating. Some have complained about the film not being as scary as advertised, and in a way, I agree. But it’s similar to this year’s Get Out. It’s a hilarious commentary on timely themes, told in the vein of a horror movie. IT isn’t just a great horror movie, it’s a great and inspiring coming-of-age story. Stop complaining about The Dark Tower and go support this film. It’s already breaking records, so please help it break a few more in the coming weeks. Otherwise, you’ll float too.

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