Monthly Archives: September 2017

“Logan Lucky” Movie Review

Never thought I’d see the day that NASCAR would actually become fun. I mean, I knew it was patriotic¬†and all, but I had no idea that I would actually be enjoying a movie that centered entirely on it. I guess the world can still surprise me. Produced on a budget of $29 million, this heist comedy from director Steven Soderbergh was released on August 18th, 2017. But due to the official end of the summer movie season, it only made $7 million in its opening weekend, although producers said that they don’t need it to be a huge success. After his 2013 film Behind the Candelabra,¬†Soderbergh swore that he was going to retire from filmmaking. But he apparently enjoyed reading Rebecca Blunt’s script so much (more on that later) that he decided to take on the project personally. Channing Tatum produces and stars as Jimmy Logan, a recently laid-off construction worker in the Appalachian country. Wanting to spend more time with his daughter, he recruits his two siblings, played by Riley Keough and Adam Driver, to help him rob the upcoming Coca-Cola 600. Along the way, he also gets the help of some petty criminals. Now many people have been calling this film one of two alternative titles: Ocean’s 7-11 or The Redneck’s Ocean’s Eleven. Being a big fan of the George Clooney-led ensemble heist film, I was very interested to see if Soderbergh would be retreading old ground with this film or come out with something completely fresh. We can discuss the semantics of that later on, but first and foremost, for what it is, is Logan Lucky a good movie? Well, yes. I can say without any doubt that this is the most “commercial” film out of Soderbergh’s versatile career. I mean aside from the obvious product placement for NASCAR and the overall patriotic feeling to the story, it also features a large ensemble cast filled with some big names. Tatum has proven his comedic worth in the Jump Street series and the slightly somber Magic Mike. Here, his timing and chemistry with a dimwitted Adam Driver is downright masterful at times. His daughter also deserves some mention. A young girl named Farrah Mackenzie plays her and is just really plucky and adorable. She is nowhere near as annoying as most child actors tend to be, and a talent show performance late in the movie had me going “Aww.” But the fact is that none of them steal the show; Daniel Craig does. Even in a film that features small parts from *deep breath* Hilary Swank, Macon Blair, Dwight Yoakam, Seth MacFarlane, Sebastian Stan, Katie Holmes, Katherine Waterson, Joey Lagano, Brian Gleeson, Jack Quaid, David Denman, and Jim O’Heir, Craig is the real star of the movie. A complete departure from his brooding in the James Bond franchise, the English man dons a bleach-blonde haircut and a thick Appalachian accent to become Joe Bang. The most obvious name for a demolitions expert this side of Explosive Bobby, he has a razor sharp comedic timing and delivers some of the best lines in the movie. I hope he considers more comedic roles after this one. Speaking of dialogue and writing, there’s been much debate about who actually wrote the screenplay for Logan Lucky. It’s credited as Rebecca Blunt, whom Steven Soderbergh swears is a real person. But this person has no other writing credits to their name, and none of the cast members have ever actually met them. In other words, until proven otherwise, “Rebecca Blunt” probably doesn’t exist. Some believe that it could have been his wife, who has screenwriting experience. Odds are, though, Soderbergh pulled a Soderbergh and just wrote the screenplay under a pseudonym. He has done it before when he frames the cinematography under the pseudonym Pete Andrews, which he continues in this film. The camera work is really well-done and there are often long, static takes of the characters’ conversations. It allows these shots to be drawn out and sometimes highlights the protagonist’s real stupidity. And from what I could tell, they used at least some natural lighting in the scenes, which gave it this grainy beauty of the Carolinas that was nice. But ultimately, I feel that there was not enough done here to completely distinguish it from Ocean’s Eleven. For every scene of a prison riot where the prisoners demand the newest Game of Thrones book from George R.R. Martin, (Easily the funniest scene in the entire movie) we cut back to a familiar setup of crooks funneling money from a corporation. Like I said in my intro, it does surprisingly make NASCAR fun to watch; I’ve always been in the minority who might watch it just for the car crashes. But, there’s also not a lot of emotional involvement with the protagonists. Sure, Jimmy lost his job and wants to spend more time with his daughter, but other than that everyone else in his crew I could care less about. Still, Logan Lucky is a formulaic but hilarious heist film with lots of energy and confidence. If you like a good old-fashioned crime movie, or just want some good laughs, look no further. It doesn’t try to be anything more or less than it needs to be: fun escapism.

Image result for logan lucky poster

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