Let’s Do It: My Favorite Movies #80-71

I’ve been busy as of late with various academic developments in my life. But now, while I still have the opportunity, I felt it was time to continue on with going through my Top 100 favorite movies of all time, starting with the next group of ten.

#80: “Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens” (2015)

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It’s funny because while I actually do agree with most of the criticisms for The Force Awakens, I also really don’t care. I can still remember a time when we Star Wars fans all just accepted the fact that a new trilogy was never going to happen. And I also remember hearing for the first time years ago that Disney would continue making Star Wars films and J.J. Abrams would be spearheading the first of those pictures. For three years, I was hyped and that excitement transferred over to the theatrical experience. Rey, Finn, Poe, and Kylo Ren all proved themselves to be complex characters worth caring for and seeing their arcs continue to grow is a thing of fascination.

#79: “The Prestige” (2006)

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Telling a nonlinear story is by no means a new or groundbreaking technique in cinema, but it takes a real storytelling genius to keep audiences invested from beginning to end. (Or end to beginning?) Few contemporary directors have achieved this as consistently as Christopher Nolan. You will most certainly find some of his other films later on this top 100, but The Prestige is perhaps his most underrated picture. All of his hijinks are on display here, and it’s utterly compelling. Nowhere else in movies will you get to watch a rivalry between two artists as abstract as magicians become so deadly and volatile.

#78: “The Shape of Water” (2017)

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A mute cleaning lady in the 1960’s falling for an ancient God-like Mer-Man? This has Guillermo del Toro fingerprints written all over it, and I mean that in the best sense possible. The Mexican auteur has always dabbled in the fantasy genre in various ways, but The Shape of Water was his first time telling a straight-up fairytale for grown-ups. And it was gorgeous to witness. It also helps that it has one of my favorite original scores of the last 10 years, thanks to Alexandre Desplat.

#77: “Gravity” (2013)

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Some will call Gravity for its numerous scientific inaccuracies. Others will dismiss it for being too “simplistic” of a movie. But on its own merits, as a low-sci-fi thriller about the need to carry on and survive in even the direst of circumstances, Alfonso Cuaron’s film is breathtakingly beautiful and unexpectedly moving. You’d be hard-pressed to find another film set in space that actually looks, feels, and sounds like the real thing.

#76: “Avatar” (2009)

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I’m not usually one to play the role of contrarian. Most of the time, I tend to fall under the same critical consensus as everyone else when it comes to opinions on popular films and I even agree with the Academy a lot of the time. Although I can’t quite explain it, there’s just something about Avatar, James Cameron’s much-maligned space epic, that just clicks with me. Sure, its storyline is extremely derivative and its overall messages may be too on the nose for some viewers. But in terms of visual storytelling and worldbuilding, the Na’vi stand almost peerless to this day. If for nothing else, it’s a perfect movie to get a Blu-Ray copy of and test your new T.V. I just happen to stay for the journey.

#75: “Being John Malkovich” (1999)

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By my estimation, Charlie Kaufman is the type of screenwriter who you either consider to be one of the most brilliant minds of the 21st century or a self-indulgent, pessimistic hack. And I believe that you would have a right to have either opinion on the matter. Admittedly, I’ve yet to watch some of his other films, but Being John Malkovich is honestly an underrated masterwork of creativity. Rarely will you ever watch a film so bizarre and original, especially one in this day and age. The whole concept of wanting to step into another person’s shoes, if only for 15 minutes, is actually quite sad but rings very true.

#74: “Metropolis” (1927)

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It truly astonishes me that this movie is 91 years old because it still feels so, so, SO pertinent in the modern era. Fritz Lang’s dystopian epic was decades ahead of its time and still holds up remarkably well to this day. Everything, from the otherworldly design of the iconic Maschinemensch to the palm-sweating finale, this stands proof that silent films can still be just as captivating as any “talkies that have come in since. There are only a handful of films that I’ve ever seen that I am willing to call “perfect” without any reservation. Metropolis is one of them.

#73: “Apollo 13” (1995)

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I was just raving about Gravity a few films up, but it probably wouldn’t have happened without Apollo 13. Ron Howard has a penchant for telling stories of ordinary people in extraordinary situations, and it’s no different with this historical drama. If you have no idea what Apollo 13 was or who was involved, go into this movie with that lack of knowledge. It’s arguably the best way to experience it, coupled with the realistic visuals and believable performances. Smart people doing smart things to get themselves out of a stupid problem. This is definitely my kind of movie.

#72: “Moonlight” (2016)

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The weirdest thing is that despite Moonlight‘s current place among my favorite movies, I initially had no interest in watching it. However, it was only after it started getting all of its well-deserved awards buzz that I began paying attention. Setting aside one of the most unprecedented Best Picture debacles in Oscars history, what Barry Jenkins accomplished here is a rarity of empathy for a kid growing up in a neighborhood that doesn’t quite understand him. It all comes from a deeply personal place, putting the audience in the middle of the world. Mark my words, its relevance will never go away.

#71: “No Country For Old Men” (2007)

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Joel Coen and Ethan Coen are both geniuses and No Country For Old Men is a stone-cold masterpiece. There’s just no way working around that sentiment for me, not when a scene like the one depicted in the image above exists for me to watch. Granted, a story by author Cormac McCarthy is certainly not going to appeal to everyone. But when you have Javier Bardem in your movie to play one of the most terrifying villains in movies ever, well, you’ve already won me over. What’s so scary about him is that he has so few words, but his presence is still felt. And I just love the ending simply because it wants to inspire discourse among film lovers.

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