“Game Over, Man!” Movie Review

Fancy a drinking game much? Take one shot every time a joke involving dicks is spouted out in this movie and I swear you will die of alcohol poisoning before the halfway mark. And frankly, that wouldn’t be such a terrible thing. The latest low-brow comedy from Netflix premiered on the streaming service on March 23rd, 2018. The film, directed by Kyle Newacheck, received an onslaught of terrible reviews, with many citing it as something even Adam Sandler would pass on. The film was produced and co-written by the same team behind Workaholics, a show on Comedy Central that was similarly raunchy and juvenile. The script was supposedly taken from their collective love of the 1988 film Die Hard, and it really shows. But somebody apparently saw the appeal and both Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg boarded as producers, thus giving it real life. Adam Devine, Anders Holm, and Blake Anderson star as three down-on-their-luck friends who work as housekeepers at a hotel in Los Angeles. The night that they seem close to funding their video game, their potential financier and a host of other celebrities at a lavish party are suddenly taken hostage by terrorists. Now the housekeepers- Alexxx, Darren, and Joel -must use their knowledge of action movies and video games to save the day. Even with such a terribly derivative and predictable plot, there was some potential here for a good parody. Although I haven’t actually watched any of Workaholics, I have seen Devine in the first two Pitch Perfect films as well as some episodes of the sitcom Modern Family. At first, I thought that he was a pretty funny guy who was able to churn out some naturalistic dialogue in most scenarios. I also watched another Netflix comedy earlier this year starring him called When We First Met, which was watchable but showed a bit that he’s wearing off rather quick. And now with Game Over, Man!, it’s becoming clear that he and his buddies are a lot like Adam Sandler; this is one of the worst movies of the year. Generally speaking, I consider myself a supporter of Netflix Original films. In an age where studios are increasingly defined by watering down projects to appeal to the lowest common denominator, here’s a service that offers a great leash on creative control. No reliance on franchise names or IP recognition is usually found in their library. *Cough Cloverfield Paradox *Cough A lot of films that they release are ones that normal distributors wouldn’t even consider touching, and sometimes that’s to Netflix’s benefit. But ever since the start of the new year, it has become increasingly hard for me to keep defending their original content. It just seems like they’re getting desperate to hit that 80-movie mark they promised last year, and there are bound to be a lot of stinkers on that list. Say this for Devine, he’s grown to be comfortable with his usual shtick, and apparently so have Anderson and Holm. However, within the first 6 minutes, these friends- who we’re supposed to be rooting for -are introduced as some of the most insufferable, annoying and obnoxious individuals to surface in modern comedy. Their needless vulgarity makes it hard to care about them, especially in the second half with an unexpected barrage of homophobic jokes. However, the film is somewhat boosted by good work from familiar faces like Neal McDonagh and Home Alone‘s Daniel Stern. Most of the rest are just F-list celebrity cameos, many of whom this generation probably hasn’t even heard of. Donald Faison, Flying Lotus, Shaggy, King Bach, Joel McHale, Fred Armisen, and Jillian Bell all show up for a few seconds, with Shaggy getting the most screen-time. Why they had him perform a song, I’m still wondering. And there really isn’t anything to talk about from a behind-the-scenes perspective because the filmmaking aspects are unimpressive. Loads upon loads of unconvincingly fake blood, CGI or cheap squibs, feel gratuitous at best. It mostly is reserved for gross-out killings of the terrorists and even party guests, along with obviously rubber cut-off genitals. The lighting feels far too overly flashy for this kind of plot if only used to heighten the glamour of L.A. nighttime party life. Plus, the camerawork by Grant Smith always feels so unnecessarily glossy and way overdone. It does a mixture of slow motion and hanheld shaky cam for the uninspired action scenes and (Unfortunately) lingering static shots for some of the more obscene jokes. And… that’s it. I have nothing else to add. It’s all just a bunch of hogwash and terrible mishmash of vastly different tones and ideas. The score just sounds like a lot of leftover tracks from Steve Jablonsky’s other films, there’s no clear direction, and everyone is either trying way too hard or not trying at all. Admittedly, there are far worse options to watch before falling asleep and forgetting about in the morning. But that doesn’t change the fact that Game Over, Man! is an overly juvenile excuse for a comedy loaded with unlikable characters. If for nothing else, this movie exists to provide Netflix naysayers new evidence at the overall lack of quality in original content the streaming service pumps out. I’ll keep trying to defend them whenever I have a chance, but now I’ve become more tempered on it. Damn you, Workaholics crew.

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