“Deadpool 2” Movie Review

Just reading the synopsis that 20th Century Fox put for this movie reaffirmed my faith in the project overall. Seriously, before even seeing a single frame of any of the trailers, I laughed my ass off so hard from just a few lines of description for “plot.” That is definitely a first for me. This *extremely* self-aware superhero comedy was released nationwide on May 18th, 2018. Originally scheduled for release on June 1st, the unexpected push-up for Avengers: Infinity War allowed it to have the more traditional early summer breakout. And thus far, it’s paid off; the film has grossed over $709 million worldwide and some of the better reviews for a superhero film this year. Following the humongous success of the first film from 2016, director Tim Miller dropped out early on due to “creative differences.” In his stead, former stuntman and John Wick co-director David Leitch makes his second solo round after last year’s Atomic Blonde. And in addition to starring in and producing the movie, Ryan Reynolds also receives his first official screenwriting credit on this film. Reynolds returns once again as Wade Wilson, a mercenary-turned costumed anti-hero with a love for chimichangas. Following an unexpected turn of events, Wilson finds himself in the company and (Initially unwanted) friendship of a young, powerful mutant runaway named Russell, played by Julian Dennison. Unfortunately, Russell is being hunted down by a grizzled mutant soldier from the future named Cable, played by Josh Brolin, who claims that the child is destined to become a mass murderer. Seeking to redeem himself, Deadpool must confront his own demons by assembling a niche superhero team of his own and save Russell from certain death. The original Deadpool, when it first came out, was one of my favorite superhero films I had seen in a very long while. It was hilarious, self-referential, and a breath of fresh, R-rated air in a dominant, almost exhausting genre. Upon further rewatches, I still really like it, but can appreciate why a lot of people were not fans of it. I was always excited for the sequel no matter what, even though the hiccup in early production seemed to indicate nothing good. Especially because, while I loved John Wick, I didn’t care for Atomic Blonde. What made it even more sensational was the fact that Joi “SJ” Harris, a motorcycle stuntwoman, accidentally died while filming. Now expectations were mounting, and the marketing team specifically poked fun at that. And personally, I’m not as big a fan as the first one, but it’s definitely just as fun and arguably more accessible for more audiences. Once again, you can expect a nice, healthy dose of self-aware humor to populate the majority of the film. For those unfamiliar with the titular character, Deadpool is actually aware that he is inside a comic book or movie or video game. His ability to break the fourth wall provides some hilarious moments of genre mockery. “We need ’em tough, morally flexible, and young enough so they can carry this franchise for 10 to 12 years,” he says after deciding to build the X-Force team from scratch. That being said, the tonal shift between these moments and the character’s serious story arc feel jarring and almost conflicting. It’s always a bit odd, if not frustrating, to see a movie conceding to the tropes that it so openly makes fun of for most of its 119 minute-long runtime. The movie is also bafflingly cynical in many areas, which could, yet again, understandably push some people away. But there is still enough in here, humor and storywise, to keep me interested until the end. Ryan Reynolds owns the persona of Wade Wilson, short and simple. Vulgar, whiny, sex-obsessed, and totally unpredictable, watching this well-trained assassin deliver kills while still cracking jokes is pretty funny and meta beyond comprehension. Also worth noting is Julain Dennison’s performance as Russell. I loved Dennison in Hunt for the Wilderpeople, and he shows a lot of the same characteristics here; a lost kid with the need for a family.  Josh Brolin appears in his second Marvel this year as Cable. This time, unlike Thanos, he’s practical, mean-spirited, and ready to kill with a Terminator-like determination. Meanwhile, Atlanta veteran star Zazie Beetz is simply delightful and fun to watch as the mutant Domino. With Luck as her superpower, there are some really creative ways in which the writers are able to show off her marksman abilities. With a bigger budget this time around, Deadpool 2 is now able to show off a lot of its fancy filmmaking techniques. David Leitch brings a lot of his regular collaborators from Atomic Blonde and John Wick onboard, which allows his skill for directing action scenes to come through above all else. One of them is cinematographer Jonathan Sela, who gives the screen a slightly dark shade to illustrate the moral ambiguity of many of the characters. He comes up with some pretty creative shots throughout the film, and each scene is given a unique color palette, whether it was the moody future Cable hails from or the relatively bright red blood of bad guys during fight sequences. Meanwhile, the editing is done quite well by Dirk Westervelt, Craig Alpert, and Elizabet Ronaldsdóttir. None of the action scenes are cut to shit, allowing the audience to clearly register what’s going on. It also cuts abruptly in certain moments to elicit sudden, serious laughter, which worked a few times. With Tom Holkenborg, AKA Junkie XL, sitting this sequel out, action movie man Tyler Bates steps in to compose the musical score. While most of the tracks are your typical bits of big orchestral strings, the best and most memorable ones come in as distorted guitar melodies. This works surprisingly well to help create a feeling of unease and relentlessness as if Cable just can’t be stopped. There’s also an original song composed for the film called “Ashes” by Céline Dion, which provides a nice emotional through-line for the story. Other songs used on the soundtrack include a hilarious opening montage with Dolly Parton’s “9-to-5,” Electronica DJ Skrillex’s “Bangarang” during an exciting highway chase sequence, and an acoustic rendition of “Take on Me” by a-Ha. The latter may be my favorite, but none compare to the brilliant James Bond-style opening credits with an overly dramatic song setting the mood. With just enough jokes and fun moments to overcome its flaws, Deadpool 2 is an endlessly meta romp that takes no prisoners. It may take me another rewatch to really love it as much as the original, but as it is, this sequel is pretty entertaining and filled to the brim with references for fans to catch. While it certainly may not be a family movie like the title character says, beneath all of its cynicism, there is a heart to the story about family and loved ones looking after one another. P.S. It might just have the great post-credit scene of any film that I’ve ever seen.

Image result for deadpool 2 poster

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