“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” Movie Review

If anyone ever tells you that there’s no more fresh air to be found in the Spider-Man mythos, just point them in the direction of this movie. Either they’ll fall head over heels for the web-slinger all over again or there’s no hope left for them. This animated superhero film was released in theaters worldwide on December 14th, 2018. Made on a budget of $90 million, it has thus far grossed over $138 million at the international box office, breaking various records for animated openings in December and becoming Sony Animation’s biggest hit. It has also been the recipient of overwhelmingly positive responses from audiences and professionals, receiving some early nominations. It was even named the best film of the year by a film critics’ group in Utah. Conceived, produced and co-written by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, the same duo behind 21 Jump Street and The Lego Movie, the film was one of many projects leaked by the Sony hacks of November 2014. From the get-go all parties involved, including director Bob Perischetti, wanted to make a movie that was stylistically different from anything the medium had offered at that point. If all goes well, the studio hopes they can launch a series of animated Web-Slinger films in the future. Shameik Moore stars as Miles Morales, a young half-black, half-Puerto Rican teen living in modern-day Brooklyn. Bored by his new private school and frustrated by the relationship between his police officer father and criminal uncle, he gets pulled into a conflict involving the famous Spider-Man. During a battle, they accidentally open up a multiverse where several other Spider-People from various dimensions have leaked into his version of New York City. With limited time, Miles must get everyone back to their dimensions while discovering his own powers and avoiding the power of crime boss Wilson Fisk. To say that the current cinematic market is flooded to the brim with superheroes would be a massive understatement. In all seriousness, it took this movie several months to get on my radar because of that very reason. It shot up to the top of my December watchlist when I discovered that it was made by Lord and Miller. I absolutely adored their work with The Lego Movie, so I was curious to see what their whip-smart and hilarious stamp would like for a comic book superhero story. Especially because the new comic book-eque style of animation looked so different and original. I’m so, so happy to report that Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse exceeded all my expectations and is easily the best Marvel film Sony has produced in a long time. Perhaps better than the Sam Raimi trilogy, or Homecoming, or even the 90’s cartoon show, what makes Into the Spider-Verse so great is how well it understands the character of Spider-Man. Here, he’s not simply a person, but an idea. A mask for anyone to put on whenever they feel like they’re ready to conquer any big trials they may be facing. Whether it’s the affable Peter Parker or a smart but lonely Afro-Latina kid from Brooklyn, they all wrestle with the expectations of it all. As one person tells Miles, “I see this spark in you. It’s amazing. Whatever you choose to do with it, you’ll be great.” There’s a lot of weight that comes with wearing a costume, and to see Miles find the strength to do so is inspiring. Shameik Moore has been a rising star for a couple years now, and his performance as Miles Morales might just be the big break he needs. Through solely his voice, he carries all of the charisma he showed off in The Get Down and Dope, and gives off a relatable charm. Jake Johnson and Hailee Steinfeld also do great work as Peter B. Parker and Gwen Stacy, respectively. Though they’re kind of messy people, they turn into unconventional mentors for Miles while also realizing that they can’t do everything on their own. The other three Spider-People are Nicholas Cage, John Mulaney, and Kimiko Green as Spider-Man Noir, Spider-Ham, (No, that’s no joke) and SP//r, respectively. Cage is perfect in the role, delivering Bogart-eque lines with deadpan pleasure, while Mulany is hilarious as the cartoony version. Other voice actors include Leiv Schreiber, Brian Tyree Henry, Mahershala Ali, Kathryn Hahn, Lili Tomlin, Luna Lauren Velez, and Zoë Kravitz in roles as various comic book characters, both major and obscure. Meanwhile, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is just as technically astounding as the hype has made it appear. This may have some of the most unique and memorable animation of any movie in recent memory. Yes, it is mostly computer-animated, but it also blends it with comic book artwork, with certain textures on the screen at all times. It occasionally throws in a couple of other styles, such as anime and traditional 2-D, but they’re all in service to creating something that feels brand new. The blending of comic art and CG creates these gorgeous, vibrant colors for the city of New York, and makes the action scenes- particularly a jaw-dropping, kaleidoscopic finale -come to life, big exclamations and thought bubbles included. Daniel Pemberton, who gave a great soundtrack to last year’s underrated King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, composes the musical score for this film. He continues to expand his wings because, in many ways similar to Black Panther, this score infuses traditional orchestral beats with hip-hop tunes. It works to great effect, as a number of tracks that leave a lasting impression. This includes a leitmotif for one of the villains, which has rapid strings and percussion undercut by a menacing distorted roar. Rapper Post Malone also contributed heavily to the soundtrack, writing an original song called “Sunflower” with Swae Lee. It’s a catchy anthem whose lyrics are pertinent to the core of the film, urging its listener to believe that they’re special in some way. It plays during the beginning and end of the film, serving as a nice bookend to the insane story. What’s more is that there is an unexpected yet heartbreaking tribute to Stan Lee in the credits, as well as Spider-Man co-creator Steven Ditko. For those unaware, these two legends died earlier in the year. Lee obviously has his obligatory cameo in the movie, but the way the filmmakers paid homage was both moving and appropriate; a fitting tribute to what he had intended with the character(s). Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is a wildly inventive and fun take on a well-worn property that celebrates inclusion. Even with my high expectations, I’m still amazed with what Phil Lord, Christopher Miller, and all other parties were able to accomplish here. This sets a new bar for animated superhero movies, and I can’t wait to see what else Sony can offer in this department.

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1 thought on ““Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” Movie Review

  1. Pingback: Retrospective: The 20 Best Films of 2018 | Geek's Landing

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