“Glass” Movie Review

I’ve always wondered what the world of psychology would think of any super-powered vigilantes running amuck. This film attempts to look directly at that field; at least temporarily anyway. This superhero thriller was first screened at 25 concurrent Alamo Drafthouse Cinema locations across the country. It as then released worldwide by Universal Pictures on January 18th, 2019, thus far managing to gross over $168.5 million against a small budget of $20 million. This made it one of the most successful openings over Martin Luther King Jr. weekend as well as the director’s career. Unfortunately, it’s been pretty hampered by mixed critical reviews, some harsher than others. Written and directed by M. Night Shyamalan, the film is meant to act as a conclusion to the Unbreakable-Split trilogy. Although he had wanted to make a sequel to his 2000 superhero gem for years, and apparently had the ending in mind the whole time, Touchstone and Disney were too disappointed by the lack of box office success to move forward. Then a few  years ago, he and Walt Disney Studios president Sean Bailey entered a gentlemen’s agreement, allowing him to use one of the characters in Split on the condition that Touchstone have a stake in a sequel, if made. Set roughly three weeks after that film, Burce Willis returns as former security guard David Dunn, a seemingly indestructible man who goes by the public persona “The Overseer.” He tracks down the disturbed 24-personality man Kevin Wendell Crumb, played by James McAvoy, only for them to both be captured and thrown into a mental asylum. Over the next several weeks, a psychiatrist named Dr. Ellie Staple, played by Sarah Paulson, attempts to convince these two men that they’re suffering from delusions of grandeur, which is apparently a growing field. However, they’re also locked up with the brittle but brilliant Elijah Price A.K.A. “Mr. Glass,” played by Samuel L. Jackson, who plans on turning David and Kevin against one another in a big showdown for the whole world to see. Although I only watched Unbreakable for the first time last year, it automatically became one of my all-time favorite films. Just the way it deconstructs not just the superhero genre but also comic books themselves was so original and engaging, and a fresh way to tell a new story. In fact, it actually holds up a lot better than most films from the same era that were actually based on comic books. Like many, I became ecstatic when 2017’s Split‘s surprise ending showed that the universe of the so-called “Eastrail 177 Trilogy” was still alive. Glass immediately shot up into the list for my most anticipated films of the year when it was finally announced for a 2019 release date. And sadly, while it is enjoyable in parts, especially the first hour, this was ultimately a very big letdown. To be clear, I don’t think that this is really a BAD movie, per se. Rather, it’s incredibly frustrating to watch and think about because there was far more potential for Glass than was in the final product. I applaud Blumhouse for allowing him to make the film the way he did, acting appropriately lowkey and small-scale. But still, you can’t help but feel like it’s simply grazing against something that could’ve been truly great. Shyamalan shows off some of his best and worst tendencies as a filmmaker here, major twist ending included. I actually thought that the ending was a good idea, and had the film been 10-20 minutes longer, it would’ve been more fulfilling. But instead, we’re left with a movie that seemingly just cuts off abruptly, but not before the director can get his obligatory cameo in. If for nothing else, the three main leads do excellent work as their respective characters. Shyamalan proves to be one of the few people capable of getting Bruce Willis to act, as his reprisal as David Dun/”The Overseer” is his best work in a while. McAvoy is even more fearless as Kevin, getting to dive headlong into numerous personalities and voices with ease, and appears to relish every moment. Meanwhile, Samuel L. Jackson proves he still has genuine dramatic acting chops as the highly intelligent and ruthless Elijah Price, who always seems one step ahead of everyone else despite his brittle state. Various actors from previous installemtns also return, such as Charlayne Woodard as Elijah’s proud mother, Anya Taylor-Joy as the only person who seemingly “gets” Kevin, and Spencer Treat Clark as Dunn’s resourceful son and partner-in-crime. The biggest addition here is Sarah Paulson as Dr. Ellie Staple. Channeling the intrigue and scenery-chewing of her various roles on American Horror Story, it’s pretty interesting to gradually learn more about Dr. Staple as the movie goes on. You’re never quite sure if she’s filling out an agenda or is genuinely concerned about these three men. From a filmmaking perspective, Glass is able to regularly impress with some of the director’s big flourishes. Mike Gioulakis, who shot It Follows and Split, handles the cinematography with an amazing amount of fluidity and grace. Many shots are meant to emulate that of a comic book art frame, and also uses primary colors to add more flavor to the characters. Purple for Mr. Glass, green for “The Overseer,” and a whole variety of shades for Kevin and “The Horde.” It also uses a healthy amount of one-shots to track the action and character movements, even if it occasionally feels a bit showy. This complements the editing by Blu Murray and Luke Ciarrochi, which is surprisingly patient with its cuts in scenes. Shots are seamlessly cut together and a number of interesting transitions are used between moments. For example, for an interview scene, each of the characters is either shown in P.O.V. shots or in close-ups, offering a glimpse inside their headspace. West Dylan Thordson provides the instrumental film score for this movie. While it doesn’t contain “Visions” and feels a little lesser compared to James Newton Howard’s work, it still works for this instance. Much like the film itself, the soundtrack isn’t like a bombastic opera you’d expect from the genre at this point. It uses a variety or instruments, including synthesized piano and dynamic percussion, to create a dark and unique atmosphere. It also incorporates a number of strings to create an interesting melody that’s both subdued and heroic, much like these protagonists. The ending suite is particularly memorable as the fruits of the director’s labors come into real focus. I definitely see where this movie wants to go; an exploration of the mythos of heroes and villains, and whether it’s real or true. It’s just not in the film enough to sustain itself for 2 hours and 9 minutes. I know that he promised this was the last one, but it still feels as though he’s wanting to set up a whole cinematic universe of his own. Glass is an engaging yet sadly disappointing study of the power of belief. There are some genuinely entertaining moments peppered throughout, and one can definitely admire M. Night Shyamalan for his ambition. And this is certainly leaps and bounds ahead of some of his worst work, but it simply can’t measure up to what Unbreakable was 19 years ago. This is unfortunately one of those scenarios where upending or subverting audience expectations doesn’t really work out.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s