“Ford v Ferrari” Movie Review

There’s a certain, unmistakable adrenaline rush I get from watching movies with really fast vehicles at the center. I always feel the need to go on a short run or something after it’s over just to wear it off. Walking out of this film, I felt that need more than usual. This biographical drama initially premiered at the 2019 Telluride Film Festival, before making an even bigger splash at TIFF the following week. It was then released in theaters worldwide by 20th Century Fox on November 15th, 2019, having previously been scheduled for June. Made for the budget of $97.6 million, it has thus far managed  to gross over $146.6 million the box office. It is likely to turn a decent profit by the end of its theatrical run and is currently the studio’s big awards season player. Directed by James Mangold, a film centered on the true-story subject had been in the works from the studio for quite some time. The earliest known version had Tom Cruise and Brad Pitt set to star with a script written by Jason Keller. That iteration fell apart after brothers Jez and John-Henry Butterworth were brought on for rewrites and Joseph Kosinski signed on to direct, and wasn’t revived until 2018. Numerous kit cars were used and painted over during the racing scenes, to avoid any potential controversy from the companies involved in the film. Set in the early 1960s, Matt Damon stars as Carroll Shelby, a renowned car mechanic and former race driver reited due to a heart condition. After a potential buyout of Ferrari goes south, Ford Motor Company, led by Tracy Lett’s Henry Ford II, approaches Shelby about creating a race car to beat Ferrari at the 24 Hours of Le Mans international race. Knowing they’ll need as much expertise as possible, Shelby enlists the help of hot-tempered English racer Ken Miles, played by Christian Bale, to begin work on the Ford GT40. As the race approaches, Carroll and Ken must stave off overshadowing suits from Ford and their own demons to build a car that not only has speed but durability. When I first heard about this film, I honestly wasn’t quite sure what to make of it. I loved Mangold’s work on Logan and 3:10 to Yuma and the talent involved was aces, but I’ve never really been into race cars. As a child, beyond the occasional Hot Wheels toy, I had not found much interest in the sport or profession. But when the first trailer dropped last summer, it immediately grabbed my attention as something old-fashioned yet new. The extreme buzz coming off of the festival circuit only added to my newfound anticipation for the film. And I’m happy to report that Ford v Ferrari is just as exciting, fun, and engaging as the marketing made it out to be. The best part about the film is that, despite the title, Ford Motor Company is not portrayed here as the heroes or even the protagonists. They’re a corporation that wants to stamp out the competition and constantly meddle with Shelby and Miles’ plan, even if they’ve never fixed a car in their lives. Instead, the focus of Ford v Ferrari is on the two protagonists trying to channel their immense passion for something into a commercially viable product. This approach could be applied to many different areas- studio executives interfering with filmmakers’ visions, tech geniuses watered down by shareholders -and makes it a far more interesting film to watch. The specificity of the racing world adds so much character and personality to the story, from the lingo used by mechanics to the observations of how it turns into “a body floating through space and time.” Its approach may feel old school, but it’s done with such precision and skill that you can’t help but fall in love with it by the final lap. Matt Damon proves he’s still got the goods as an actor with a steely determination and delightful Texas accent. As Carroll Shelby, he shows a real knack for how to build cars and always tries to explain why he needs what he needs to his corporate overseers. He’s always precise in his method but constantly thinks on his feet in case the worst comes to pass. Opposite him for much of the movie, Christian Bale is brilliant as the hot-headed yet confident racecar driver Ken Miles. A perfectionist if ever there was one, he has no trouble telling his colleagues if the design is terrible and frequently irritates others around him. It’s also one of the few roles I’ve seen where he uses his natural speaking voice, which adds a nice amount of character to him. Josh Lucas is also notable as Leo Beebe, the Ford executive who constantly interferes with the protagonists in their task. Its quite clear that he’s more interested in following tradition and keeping up with the company’s quota, unwilling to raise the GT40’s budget when necessary. The supporting cast is rounded out by Tracey Letts as the shrewd but determined Henry Ford II, Caitriona Balfe and Noah Jupe as Ken Miles’ supportive wife and son, Jon Bernthal as the more optimistic VP of Ford, Ray McKinnon as Shelby’s second-in-command on the team, and Remo Girone as the proud and elderly  rival Enzo Ferrari. Each one has something to contribute and further enriches the world of cars and racing. While many of them fall into the classic archetypes of the genre, they give extra shades and dimensions to make them feel fresh. And just looking at technical aspects, Mangold and company put so much effort and class into Ford v Ferrari. The cinematography by Phedon Papamichael is in such control of the frame and subject that it’s hard to lose attention. It captures the colors of all of the cars with exquisite beauty and always manages to light it very well whether it’s in the daytime or nighttime. Clever and well-placed angles create a lot of unique negative space for the characters as we move through their process of building the GT40. The camera alternates between gliding tracks as we follow the vehicles up close and long shots to signify their real speed. It goes hand-in-hand with the joint editing job by Michael McCusker and Andrew Buckland, which keeps the pacing going along. Even with a runtime of 2 hours and 32 minutes, it goes by at an even clip, as we watch Carroll and Ken constantly work through different cars to get it just right. During the race sequences… oh Lord. They’re edited together so well that’s hard not to become invested in what’s happening. The way it constantly cuts between the drivers in action and the engineering team at the sidelines helps create the main tension. It also helps that the sound design is pitch perfect and captures every engine rev, every crash, and every gear shift imaginable. It really helps put viewers inside the car itself when the going gets tough. Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders collaborate together on the instrumental film score, and deliver something worthy of the fast-paced drama. The majority of the tracks rely on electric guitar riffs, basses, and light percussion to create a sense of urgency in the race and building process. Subtle at first, as the film goes along, the score becomes more and more powerful as the Le Mans edges closer. A couple of tracks a little calmer and opt to use synthesized organs and slower guitar melodies to emphasize the pure, encapsulating experience of driving on an empty road. It’s a really dynamic soundtrack, and one I’ll definitely come back to. Proving that old-school stories can still be told with expertise, Ford v Ferrari tells a riveting true story of creativity with enormous flare and respect. Rather than trying to upend the genre, James Mangold utilizes the tools at his disposal to deliver the best the genre can possibly offer and then some. Matt Damon and Christian Bale shine in their dual lead performances and give an accessibility to a story that, on paper, sounds flat and boring. But thanks to them and the dedicated team behind the scenes, this film feels like both a blast from the past and completely modern in its technique. Mark my words, it’ll turn into one of those movies that will be impossible to not watch all the way through if it ever comes up on streaming or cable.

2 thoughts on ““Ford v Ferrari” Movie Review

  1. Pingback: Ford v Ferrari Deserves More Award Buzz – Movies, Movies, Movies

  2. Pingback: Retrospective: The 20 Best Films of 2019 | Geek's Landing

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