Category Archives: Comedy

“Beauty and the Beast” Movie Review

It’s a tale as old as time with songs as old as rhyme. Meaning this is probably not the last interpretation of the story we’re getting in the next century or so. This is just a warmup. The latest live-action Disney remake, this romantic musical fantasy was released around the world on March 17th, 2017, going on to gross over $1.2 billion at the box office. It likely would have made more had it not been for a certain controversy that we’ll discuss in a little bit. Initially, the studio had planned an adaptation of the Broadway musical from 1994, which never made it past development hell. However, in the wake of other successful remakes such as Cinderella and The Jungle Book, a plan was put together. Twilight: Breaking Dawn director Bill Condon signed on and the whole cast was announced, making this dream become a reality. Emma Watson stars as Belle, a beautiful young woman who is ridiculed in her small French village for reading. After rejecting the egotistical hunter Gaston, she discovers that her father has been captured in a decrepit castle, hosted by a mysterious Beast. She offers to take her father’s place and begins a strange and unexpected relationship with the Beast. The word that has been tossed around the most in regards to this movie is “unnecessary.” An unnecessary remake, an unnecessary movie, an unnecessary cash grab by Disney. I don’t entirely disagree with this sentiment, as it is extremely (almost detrimentally) faithful to the 1991 animation classic. But last year’s remake of The Magnificent Seven wasn’t really necessary, and yet I still really enjoyed that one. And it’s the same case here. Did Disney have to do a live-action remake of Beauty and the Beast? Absolutely not. But even so, Bill Condon did a fine job of reimagining this timeless story for a new generation. Like I said, this movie caused some pre-release controversy, but not because of its existence. It was because LeFou, Gaston’s plump sidekick played wonderfully by Josh Gad, was revealed to be gay. This was a landmark for Disney as their first homosexual character, but caused quite a stir in certain countries and theaters. The film was banned in Kuwait and Malaysia, was refused by a theater in Alabama, and received a very strict rating in Russia. Here was my reaction to the revelation: How could we have ever assumed that LeFou was straight in the animation? His mere behavior and the “gay moment” talked about by many pundits were very natural to the story. Emma Watson plays Belle very nicely but is nothing worth putting in the record books as an all-time great performance. Her beauty matches her character (whose name literally translates in French as “beautiful”) and her compassion is very much present. Dan Stevens, who has proven himself in the excellent thriller The Guest and Marvel’s Legion, is especially good as the Beast. He gives off a charm and wit that seemed missing the first time around. The supporting cast is filled out by a mass of big names, some of whom sing better than others. Kevin Kline plays Belle’s eccentric father, Ewan McGregor is delightful as a dancing candlelight Luminere, Sir Ian McKellen sounds Gandalf as the clock Cogsworth, Emma Thompson is warm as the teapot Mrs. Pots, while Stanley Tucci, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Nathan Mack, and Audra McDonald play the rest of the lively house utensils. But the obvious show-stealer here is Luke Evans as Gaston, the handsome and cocky villain of the town. Seemingly born to play the role, he is so delightful and fun to watch, despite his character’s despicable nature. He absolutely looks like he is having the time of his life playing this guy up, and that energy really seeps off the screen. Whenever he was singing or riling the villagers up, I wanted to get up and dance with him at his side. Meanwhile, on the technical side of things, Disney spared not a dime of its $160 million budget. Beautiful, wide shots of the setting by Tobias A. Schliessler give it this certain feeling of being whimsical, as the story should be. It also brings out the amazing use of bright colors in otherwise drab-looking environments. Costume and production design is also gorgeous. Even when some of the CGI for the Beast or his servants isn’t very convincing, the sets and clothes of our characters are a joy to look at. The famous dance scene between Belle and the Beast was recreated to perfection here, and the design of her dress and his suit made it even more appealing to see. Alan Menken returns to compose the musical score not just for this movie but for his 11th collaboration with the studio. Virtually all of the songs from the original are present, but a few new ones have been added. Of particular note is the number “Evermore” sung by Stevens. I felt it added more depth to the Beast’s feelings for Belle and his struggles with accepting those in his hollow life. It’s possibly a contender for Best Original Song this February. Aside from that, most of the new songs are kind of flat. Even though it ultimately falls too far back on the original film, Beauty and the Beast is a lovely adventure for all ages to appreciate. Its lessons are conveyed the only way a Disney film can do it, with great characters and music to boot. If you just want a movie to watch with your whole family on a night in that’s relatively lightweight, it’s available on Netflix right now. Give it a chance.

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“Fifty Shades of Grey” Movie Review

Let me just come out of the gate here by saying that I love you guys. I did this review for you and your entertainment. Just keep that in mind. This so-called erotic “romance” was released worldwide on Valentine’s Day of 2015, grossing over $571 million(!) at the box office. That means it was breaking several box office records for both an R-rated movie and a movie released in February. And it opened in 3.646 theaters. Based on the novel by E.L. James, my guess is that you already know the plot synopsis for this movie. A young woman named Anastasia Steele takes over her sick friend’s interview with Christian Grey. Grey is a billionaire entrepreneur who is secretly into BDSM- bondage, domination, and sadomasochism. They begin a relationship of sorts and begin going into this world of eroticism and control. Look, I’m going to be completely honest with you guys: I actually read the book before I watched the movie Fifty Shades of Grey. Yes, I did a double whammy here. Why? you might ask. For two reasons. 1) Morbid curiosity sometimes takes over my better instincts. 2) I am a fucking idiot sometimes. But seriously, I gave this book/film a genuine chance to surprise me. I had heard all of the negative press going in. It was quite shocking honestly. And I figured it couldn’t be as bad as I heard it was. I mean, make no mistake, there’s only so much that can be expected of a movie that’s based on a book that started out as Twilight fan fiction that was written on the author’s Blackberry. (Look all that up, it’s real, and it shows) Unfortunately, much like my experience with Manos: The Hands of Fate, there’s absolutely no reason to like this movie and was even worse than all of the tales had suggested. The leads in the movie, as attractive as they may be, share zero chemistry whatsoever. I have seen Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan be great in other roles, like The Fall or The Social Network. But good God, they had no conviction to for their roles here. Their laughably written dialogue and banter didn’t help much either. The amount of people and drafts the script went through and still managed to get lines like “I’m fifty shades of fucked up” or “I can’t bear to hurt you because I love you” is simply incredible. The main female is one of the weakest female characters I’ve ever seen in a feature film and/or novel. She seriously is going to keep going back to this guy even though she hates being slapped and beaten in BDSM? How am I supposed to like this woman if she is a complete and utter idiot? The man, meanwhile, is a total creep who wants to control her, despite having only bumped into her a couple times to justify their relationship. Actually, let me correct myself: he warns her every so often that he’s not the man for her, and yet they keep going at it. And yeah, how about the sex scenes? With so much hype surrounding it, and virtually being the only thing driving the plot, you’d expect the sex scenes to at least to be passably interesting. They’re explicit for an R-rating, for sure. But if it really wanted to go full Blue is the Warmest Color for its audience, it should have been rated NC-17. (I apologize for comparing this pile of shit to Blue is the Warmest Color. Call it an insult if you want.) But since they want to make money, they just settle for something that teenagers can see. Instead, for the (And I’m being generous here) three scenes where it does actually happen, it’s just passionless intercourse cut together with contemporary pop songs. It was so awkward and dull, despite ample nudity. The least a movie about eroticism could do is make me feel excited at two attractive people taking off their clothes and having sex for about two hours. But it’s too horrendously boring to be sexy and features too much plot to be called a piece of pornography. It wants to be theatrically and be judged with the big boys? We are going to judge this as a movie. I can’t go on any further. I’m too mad and angry to keep chugging out words to describe how truly awful this “film/book” is. It is, hands down, one of the worst movies I have ever seen in my entire life. Believe the horror stories. Fifty Shades of Grey is a boring glorification of abusive relationships masquerading as a romance. Even members of the BDSM culture have taken offense to this movie, which is really saying something. If you really want to watch two young millennials getting it on in a steamy, sexy way… just watch Blue is the Warmest Color or any number of PornHub productions. I will never understand why so many single women find this so appealing. And we’re getting two more of these. (Three depending on if they split the last part into two halves) But look at it this way: As long as there’s one of these infecting theaters near you, I will be there to inform you of its terribleness. Am I looking forward to it? Nope. But I’m all about balance in the world.

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“Kingsman: The Golden Circle” Movie Review

You know how I can tell this franchise is a satire of the James Bond series? The followup is even more ridiculous and weird than last time. This darkly comedic spy action film was released on September 22nd, 2017, earning back almost its entire $100 million budget in the opening weekend alone.  Dethroning IT for the top spot of the box office, this pretty much guarantees’s 2017 to be the biggest September of all time. Following the surprise success of The Secret Service, former Kick-Ass director Matthew Vaughn signed on to return to the helm again, a first for his career. And according to him, writing the screenplay with Jane Goldman was the hardest thing he had ever done. Roughly a year after the events of the first installment, Eggsy Unwin has firmly set into the titular espionage organization. A new drug organization called the Golden Circle led by Poppy Adams, played by Julianne Moore, systematically wipes out all of the Kingsman around the U.K. The only two survivors, Eggsy and Merlin, then travel to America to join their cousins, the Statesman. With their help, they plan to save the world from the drugs and avenge their fallen brethren. Kingsman: The Secret Service was a massive surprise on almost all accounts when it was released back in 2015. I loved almost everything about it: the action sequences, the cast, the dark humor, the wacky story. And admittedly, I am very skeptical about sequels, but I’ll always give them a chance. Since the film basically has nothing to do with the Mark Millar comic book of the same name, it would be especially interesting to see where this series would go. And while this followup is undeniably entertaining and over-the-top… it seems that this franchise has already run out of ideas. Many critics have complained about the film’s ridiculous and seemingly offensive nature. I would like to remind everyone that the first film featured a massacre inside the Westboro Baptist Church while the guitar solo of “Freebird” was playing. So if I were to go in expecting a challenging film from a serious filmmaker, then I would automatically be disappointed. But perhaps it’s because the first one was so shocking in its boundary-pushing attitude that we are less surprised when it happens. Its cynicism is actually quite apparent in its attempt to provide a satirical commentary on the War on Drugs. And while the female characters are relegated to the sidelines as villains or love interests, I wouldn’t go so far as to call it offensive. Easily the best thing holding this sequel together is Taron Egerton, who has grown comfortable as Eggsy. His foul mouth and sly wit make him extremely likable and worth rooting for against any bad guy that he faces. Mark Strong, meanwhile, gets a chance to show us more of Merlin after being a supporting player last time. Despite always getting typecast as a villain, he has a surprisingly effective sense of humor and his Scottish accent made his enunciation of certain phrases particularly chuckle-worthy. Colin Firth (Whose mere appearance in the trailers should warrant me talking about him, spoiler hounds) returns as Harry/Galahad and still retains the qualities of an unconventional father figure. At first he seemed like useless fan service, but he is later worked into the plot in a satisfyingish way. The way you can tell this film is bigger is because of how many big names have a role, large or small. Julianne Moore is one of the best actresses working today, and she’s not afraid to embrace her character’s quirkiness. You can tell she’s having a blast as the antagonist, especially since she parodies the cliches of a Bond villain. Elton John makes a three-scene cameo as a caricature of himself. He is rather hilarious and knows exactly how to make the audience laugh. The Statesman consist of Channing Tatum, Halle Berry, Pedro Pascal, and Jeff Bridges as yet another heightened version of the actor we know and love. But honestly, I couldn’t really bring myself to care about them for they were so underdeveloped and speedily introduced. The whole technical behind-the-scenes crew returns for the second time around and it really shows. From the orchestral score by Henry Jackman and Matthew Margeson to the incredible camerawork by George Richmond, Vaughn is able to keep his distinct personality in check at every frame. And while there was no real “church scene” this time, there was one battle near the end that seemed reminiscent of it as it was all captured (or edited and manipulated to look like) one shot. But the thing weighing The Golden Circle down is the absurd amount of new content shoved into the plot. As I’ve been critical with other films this year, the movie feels the need to put in more and more tidbits about the world that could be explored in a later installment. While some of that is interesting to see, and I do want to see more of it, there’s so much that is going on that it’s hard to stay attached to it all at the same time. It clocks in at just over 2 hours and 20 minutes long. It often feels as if at least 30 minutes were left on the cutting room floor. Studios- Make a good movie first, plan a franchise later. Even so, I didn’t completely hate it. Kingsman: The Golden Circle is an overbloated and cumbersome sequel that still elicits some genuine enjoyment. Who knows, by tomorrow, I might not think anything of it anymore, but for now, it’s some passable fun. Without Egerton, Strong, Firth, or Moore, this movie would have sunk into the valley of forgettable corporate practice, but they make it more heartened. There is potential for this series in the future, and I want to see where they go. Just a little more restrained.

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“Logan Lucky” Movie Review

Never thought I’d see the day that NASCAR would actually become fun. I mean, I knew it was patriotic and all, but I had no idea that I would actually be enjoying a movie that centered entirely on it. I guess the world can still surprise me. Produced on a budget of $29 million, this heist comedy from director Steven Soderbergh was released on August 18th, 2017. But due to the official end of the summer movie season, it only made $7 million in its opening weekend, although producers said that they don’t need it to be a huge success. After his 2013 film Behind the Candelabra, Soderbergh swore that he was going to retire from filmmaking. But he apparently enjoyed reading Rebecca Blunt’s script so much (more on that later) that he decided to take on the project personally. Channing Tatum produces and stars as Jimmy Logan, a recently laid-off construction worker in the Appalachian country. Wanting to spend more time with his daughter, he recruits his two siblings, played by Riley Keough and Adam Driver, to help him rob the upcoming Coca-Cola 600. Along the way, he also gets the help of some petty criminals. Now many people have been calling this film one of two alternative titles: Ocean’s 7-11 or The Redneck’s Ocean’s Eleven. Being a big fan of the George Clooney-led ensemble heist film, I was very interested to see if Soderbergh would be retreading old ground with this film or come out with something completely fresh. We can discuss the semantics of that later on, but first and foremost, for what it is, is Logan Lucky a good movie? Well, yes. I can say without any doubt that this is the most “commercial” film out of Soderbergh’s versatile career. I mean aside from the obvious product placement for NASCAR and the overall patriotic feeling to the story, it also features a large ensemble cast filled with some big names. Tatum has proven his comedic worth in the Jump Street series and the slightly somber Magic Mike. Here, his timing and chemistry with a dimwitted Adam Driver is downright masterful at times. His daughter also deserves some mention. A young girl named Farrah Mackenzie plays her and is just really plucky and adorable. She is nowhere near as annoying as most child actors tend to be, and a talent show performance late in the movie had me going “Aww.” But the fact is that none of them steal the show; Daniel Craig does. Even in a film that features small parts from *deep breath* Hilary Swank, Macon Blair, Dwight Yoakam, Seth MacFarlane, Sebastian Stan, Katie Holmes, Katherine Waterson, Joey Lagano, Brian Gleeson, Jack Quaid, David Denman, and Jim O’Heir, Craig is the real star of the movie. A complete departure from his brooding in the James Bond franchise, the English man dons a bleach-blonde haircut and a thick Appalachian accent to become Joe Bang. The most obvious name for a demolitions expert this side of Explosive Bobby, he has a razor sharp comedic timing and delivers some of the best lines in the movie. I hope he considers more comedic roles after this one. Speaking of dialogue and writing, there’s been much debate about who actually wrote the screenplay for Logan Lucky. It’s credited as Rebecca Blunt, whom Steven Soderbergh swears is a real person. But this person has no other writing credits to their name, and none of the cast members have ever actually met them. In other words, until proven otherwise, “Rebecca Blunt” probably doesn’t exist. Some believe that it could have been his wife, who has screenwriting experience. Odds are, though, Soderbergh pulled a Soderbergh and just wrote the screenplay under a pseudonym. He has done it before when he frames the cinematography under the pseudonym Pete Andrews, which he continues in this film. The camera work is really well-done and there are often long, static takes of the characters’ conversations. It allows these shots to be drawn out and sometimes highlights the protagonist’s real stupidity. And from what I could tell, they used at least some natural lighting in the scenes, which gave it this grainy beauty of the Carolinas that was nice. But ultimately, I feel that there was not enough done here to completely distinguish it from Ocean’s Eleven. For every scene of a prison riot where the prisoners demand the newest Game of Thrones book from George R.R. Martin, (Easily the funniest scene in the entire movie) we cut back to a familiar setup of crooks funneling money from a corporation. Like I said in my intro, it does surprisingly make NASCAR fun to watch; I’ve always been in the minority who might watch it just for the car crashes. But, there’s also not a lot of emotional involvement with the protagonists. Sure, Jimmy lost his job and wants to spend more time with his daughter, but other than that everyone else in his crew I could care less about. Still, Logan Lucky is a formulaic but hilarious heist film with lots of energy and confidence. If you like a good old-fashioned crime movie, or just want some good laughs, look no further. It doesn’t try to be anything more or less than it needs to be: fun escapism.

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“Cloud Atlas” Movie Review

“Epic.” It’s a word that has been tossed around by writers, scholars, and illiterates for several decades. What’s it actually mean? A long story, one typically derived from ancient oral tradition, narrating the deeds and adventures of heroic and legendary figures or in the history of a nation. In the days of yore, authors would create grand masterpieces that fit that description, from the iconic poem Beowulf to the big daddy of them all War and Peace. They were hard to get through but still superb. Nowadays, if you simply typed up the word “epic” into the search bar on YouTube, you’d get somewhere in the neighborhood of 98 million results. Most of them are just stupid comedy videos such as “Most Epic Nerf War in History” or “Epic Battle Music.” I, myself, am guilty of watching those and can safely say that none of them really live up to their titles. It’s completely apparent that many have forgotten in this day and age what the word actually means. On a similar level, they are very few movies that can be appropriately called an epic. To reach that achievement would be to go beyond the boundaries of convention and time. To make one would be to inhabit the modern spirit of David Lean, who made such films as Lawrence of Arabia. To immerse the audience in a world as vast and lush as Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy. To have an experience on the scale of epics like Titanic just doesn’t seem possible anymore. Along come Tom Tykwer and the Wachowski siblings, who absolutely endeavor to create an epic together called Cloud Atlas. It is based on the novel of the same name by David Mitchell, which may be one of the most impressive pieces of modern literature I’ve read. That’s right. I read the book a film was based upon before actually sitting down to watch the film. I rarely do that, but I was so fascinated by the division to a film like this that I was curious. And I sit here at my desktop stunned. Cloud Atlas recounts six separate stories spanning many centuries and many genres. Starting with a dying American lawyer on a 19th century vessel, followed by a forbidden love story with a penniless English composer, cut in the middle with an intense detective conspiracy, making us laugh in the present with an editor on the run from the mob, a neon-soaked future with clones and rebels, and a crazy post-apocalyptic society that has a strange dialect. Whereas in the book each individual story is cut in half and shown in chronological order, the movie edits the stories together seamlessly, scene-to-scene. And despite its mammoth running time of 2 hours and 51 minutes, there’s not a minute wasted or rushed here. It flies by and time becomes nonexistent. And while I could whiff on and rave about its fantastic editing, the point isn’t the stories per-say. In fact, none of them are really given any priority over the other. The point of this film, as well as the novel, is to show us that everything in life and death is connected. As one character puts it, “Our lives are not our own. We are bound to others, past and present, and by each crime and every kindness, we birth our future.” You’d be hard-pressed to find a piece of cinema or literature that tackles topics as ambitious as that more brilliantly than Cloud Atlas. By the final 30 minutes of the picture, it brings everything to a head in a very emotionally satisfying way. I acknowledge that this isn’t a perfect movie. There are some editing choices that I would have cleaned up, and I’m pretty sure at least one character was useless. But isn’t it human to be flawed? All of the characters here are flawed individuals. And when a movie takes on such a big task of tackling a massive story, it can be forgiven for a few mistakes. And thankfully, there are only a few. I’m sure if I saw it again, I’d hardly notice any flaws at all the second time. Not to mention its beautiful and sometimes moving soundtrack by Tykwer, Johnny Klimek, and Reinhold Heil. Arguably the biggest thread tying everything together is the piece “The Cloud Atlas Sextet,” which also exists in the book. It’s a gorgeous piano melody that inspires upon first listen. The whole rest of the orchestral score is stunning, but it baffles me that this didn’t get a nomination from the Academy. In fact, the film wasn’t nominated for anything, which either blames tough competition or lack of diverse tastes on part of the voters. I’m usually the kind of guy that likes to get his opinion of a movie out there immediately. But with this particular picture, I had to let it marinate for two straight days and nights. Let every little detail get soaked in and think about the themes of it all. I have rarely seen a movie that forces me to wait overnight to form an official opinion on it. Even more unique is a film that can also be the basic definition of the word “epic.” And I can say without a shadow of a doubt that Cloud Atlas is, indeed, that rare movie. It is as brilliant as it is gorgeous and proves the potential of modern filmmaking. Those who once thought that this novel was “unfilmable” have been proven wrong. While not perfect, it has been on my mind way too much for me to give it any less than high praise. For now, until I decide otherwise, I’ll say this: Cloud Atlas is one of the best movies I have ever seen and one of the best books I’ve ever read.

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“Okja” Movie Review

Here we are, folks. We have yet another Netflix original movie that I am super late on reviewing. But hey, as a wise Wizard once said, “We have work to do.” This unorthodox science-fiction film by writer-director Bong Joon-ho competed for the prestigious Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. It later was added on the streaming giant Netflix on June 28th, garnering positive reviews from critics and audiences alike. It also gained unwanted attention at Cannes for causing a few technical glitches during its runtime, prompting debate if streaming services should be allowed to compete at festivals at all. The real concern people should have with this movie is whether it will convince audiences to become vegetarians as a result. In the not-too-distant future, mankind has started creating GMO animals to feed the population. One of these is a massive “super-pig” named Okja, who attracts the attention of a powerful food corporation and the radical Animal Liberation Front. And Okja’s friend, a young Korean girl named Mija, does her best to protect her from all these forces just so she can live a happy, quiet life in her mountainous home. Joon-ho’s previous film, Snowpiercer from 2014, was a great and underrated film not nearly enough people saw. In fact, I would say that it was the film that made me want to start sharing my opinions on film on my blog because I had quite a bit to share about that picture. And so ever since I saw it in theaters, I’ve been salivating to see whatever the singular South Korean filmmaker could conjure up, even if it wasn’t technically released theatrically. Still, after absorbing 2 hours and 2 minutes of his new vision in 2017, I feel content with what he has given us. Mija is played by a complete newcomer named Ahn Seo-hyun, and this is a name that we should keep an eye on in the future. Despite only being 13 years old, she demonstrates a strong will and commitment to compassion most young girls may aspire to. It’s also believed that she performed some of her own stunts, which makes it all the more obvious how awesome she is. By her side is a big English-speaking supporting cast, all of whom offer some unique flavor to the experience. Tilda Swinton especially impresses in her dual role as sisters who own a massive corporation. One’s an eccentric but mostly likable woman, while the other is a heartless corporate magnate, reminiscent of her role as Mason in Snowpiercer. Her incredible range is on full display here and proves that she can basically kill any role that she takes. Paul Dano, Lily Collins, Devon Bostwick, Daniel Henshall, and The Walking Dead‘s Steven Yeun appear as members of the ALF, while Giancarlo Esposito felt as though he were simply waiting for his paycheck to clear. Jake Gyllenhaal plays a washed up and drunk T.V. personality who is so clearly out of touch with his current state of popularity. His performance is totally out-there and provides a Segway for many shifts in tone. Piggybacking off of that, the primary point of criticism people have had with Okja is that it juggles its tone around too often. These complaints are valid. Sometimes, a scene that is very serious will become hilarious through the insertion of a moment that is just so absurd. Or vice versa. Also, a number of times, it shifts from being a fun action scene to an intense moment of torture or violence. To be fair, Joon-ho has done this in his previous films. If you watch his monster flick, The Host, it’s clear that he likes to shift the viewers’ mood on the snap of a finger. It can be jarring, but I’m willing to forgive him on account of sheer ballsiness. The film is also technically brilliant. Darrius Khondji is a vastly underrated cinematographer who continuously proves his worth, with his work on recent Woody Allen films as visual proof. Following in the footsteps of his stunning work on The Lost City of Z earlier this year, the mountains of Korea look green and gorgeous, which contrasts nicely with the condensed atmosphere of the city of Manhattan. It, along with Yang Jin-mo’s excellent off-kilter editing job, gives this film a feeling so foreign and different than what we are used to. Extreme close-ups of characters followed by big sweeping shots of the parading streets of Seoul or New York allows for the personality to come into play. The visual effects also deserve some praise-worthy commentary. The design for the “super pigs” that Mirando is using is really unique and appealing. The titular character is nothing short of adorable and likable. Even though we don’t know her whole history, we’re immediately on her side and want her to spend peaceful time with Mija. But the film doesn’t shy away from the harsh realities of the processed food industry. A scene two-thirds of the way through shows a rather disturbing and graphic mating scene between Okja and another “super pig.” But it’s later in the last 20 minutes of Okja that it transitions from a fun sci-fi adventure into a twisted look at the American slaughterhouse. It creates a bit of moral ambiguity as Mirando’s true intention is revealed, but it’s not evil or far-fetched. They just want to feed the world, no matter how many animals have to be killed for it. There have been reports of people who have given up eating meat and become vegetarians/vegans as a result of watching this movie. I’m still fine, but I can’t say the same for you. Okja balances a tricky tonal juggling act with a plucky hero and great characters. Bong Joon-ho is a brilliant director and deserves more recognition after this film’s release. It also proves that Netflix movies can be just as big and enjoyable as anything getting a theatrical release. It all just depends on the talent behind everything.

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“To the Bone” Movie Review

Damn it, Netflix. You’re $20 billion in debt currently, yet you continue to purchase and distribute original content to us. If you would slow down and give us quality like this, maybe you would be financially better. Oh well. This R-rated independent drama made a splash at this year’s Sundance Film Festival in the official competition. Shortly after its premiere, the online streaming giant Netflix acquired the distribution rights, one of many purchases at the event. Written and directed by Marti Noxon, the film is believed to have been inspired by her early battles with eating disorders. The story focuses on a young woman named Ellen who is struggling with severe anorexia, meaning she can’t eat food and she wants to vomit at the mere sight of food. Having run out of options, her family arranges for her to meet an unconventional specialist Dr. Beckham, played by Keanu Reeves. This specialist, refusing to let her give in, moves her into a house with other patients determined to fight their condition. So earlier this year, Netflix released the original teen drama series 13 Reasons Why. Many people loved it, but I saw it as a manipulative, insulting, and sometimes disgusting interpretation of its incredibly sensitive subject matter. It took the nature of teenage suicide and tried to make it into something intriguing and sexy, neither of which did any victims any justice. Because of that, I clicked “Play” on both this and the new series Atypical (Which may end up being a review soon) with serious hesitation. Would it take a taboo subject like eating disorders seriously or try to pander to the lowest common denominator? Thankfully, To the Bone falls into the former category. Lily Collins is an absolute revelation in the lead role as Ellen. Losing so much weight for the role, her character’s a complete wisecracking cynic. If they had gotten someone else for the part, she would have just come off as unlikable and insufferable. Thankfully, Collins’ subtlety and sharp tongue make a person we can understand and side with, even in her lowest moments. Alex Sharp plays one of the other patients, a ballet dancer who struggled to eat after breaking his knee. Despite his extreme optimism towards the other house members, you can tell that he mentally tortured himself and wants to better. Although he came off as a bit annoying at times, he really grew on me over time. Keanu Reeves, meanwhile, gives a performance totally unlike any previously in his action-heavy career. An uncompromising doctor with a fundamental sense of optimism, he at one point encourages Ellen to find the dispiriting voice inside her head and tell it “Fuck off voice.” His lines are the only bits of levity and balance in this film, delivered only the way Reeves could do it. That’s a relief because this movie is not a fun time by any stretch of your imagination. This is an absolutely bleak, mature, and sometimes disturbing portrayal of eating disorders, and refuses to pull any punches. Some critics have labeled To the Bone as corny or misguided in its approach to the subject matter. As a person who has actually met people with eating disorders, I can say without a shadow of a doubt that this movie is not corny at all. In fact, it accurately portrays not just how Ellen reacts to her own sickness, but how her loved ones deal with it, and the results aren’t always easy to watch. Let’s talk a bit regarding the technical side of everything. Cinematographer Richard Wong frames the picture with precision and focus, often giving us wide takes of the dinner table or at group meetings. It allows for us to have a good view of everyone involved. My favorite scene in the entire movie came when the Beckham and patients visited an underground waterfall with a small natural light at the side. It was a gorgeously shot and directed moment that gave the characters a glimmer of hope. It also went down to the song “Water” by Jack Garrat, and witnessing Sharp’s dance moves to it was perhaps the one part of the movie that made me smile. Lili Taylor is an extremely underrated actress, having proven her worth on the excellent show Six Feet Under. In this movie, she plays Ellen’s biological mother, who hasn’t been a major part of her life for quite some time. She tries to offer her support to her, culminating in a beautiful scene near the end of the film. On paper, it would sound kind of dumb and awkward, but the way it’s executed completely floored me. In fact, would dare say that it is one of the most emotionally powerful scenes of the entire year. I will say, I don’t think I could ever watch it again. As relevant and well-made as it is, I feel it was too powerful an experience to have more than once. Also, some things that happen late in the film feel a bit tacked on and forced, almost like they could have been left on the cutting room floor. I don’t consider this movie to be perfect by any means. Even so, To the Bone is an unflinching yet empathetic look at a highly undervalued problem. The writing is already great, but it’s the performances of Lily Collins and Keanu Reeves that make it what it is. Be warned of how challenging it can be for those with a weak stomach.

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