Category Archives: Emotional

“There Will Be Blood” Movie Review

So recently, actor Daniel Day-Lewis announced that he was done with the film industry and will spend the rest of his life in private with his family. I absolutely respect this decision of his, but please don’t actually give up acting. You’re amazing at it. This epic historical drama was released during the height of award season in 2007, garnering more critical and commercial success than most independent films. Paul Thomas Anderson’s modern classic also earned 8 Academy Award nominations and is considered by many critics film scholars to be one of the best films from the 2000’s. Based on the novel Oil! by Upton Sinclair, we follow Daniel Plainview, a man in the San Fernando Valley who begins exploiting the rich amount of oil beneath the surface of the land. As the R-rated narrative moves from the late 19th into the early 20th century, his lust for more of this resource grows and grows, even when some meager competition gets in the way. But he won’t let them compromise anything for him. Many of Anderson’s trademark filmmaking styles are present here, as well as some differentiations. He directs the drama beautifully and confidently, as most of the cast seems to be made up of actors or actresses who know what they’re doing. And as good as Boogie Nights and Magnolia were, I would say that not only is this his most accessible film to date, but also his best. And this is coming from someone who enjoyed both Magnolia and Boogie Nights immensely. At the forefront of everything in this film is Daniel Day-Lewis’ Oscar-winning performance, which may just be one of the best ever put to celluloid. Masterful and wholesome in every sense, his character is an interesting one. Plainview is someone you should normally hate but can’t help understand and want to see him succeed in his endeavors. When remarking on his ruthlessness and cunning intellect, he remarks to a comrade, “I see the worst in people. I don’t need to look past seeing them to get all I need.” It’s no surprise that P.T. Anderson had written the part specifically with him in mind. In a duel role, the underrated but versatile Paul Dano plays two brothers both seeking a profit off the main protagonist’s petroleum ventures. One’s a carful-minded pragmatist wishing to benefit just for the sake of it, another is a devout pastor desperate to keep preaching his beliefs by acquiring the funds necessary to do so. Even as far as religious fanatics go, this guy was borderline unlikable. Note: The fact that Eli was this awful possibly made Daniel Plainview even more of a likable character than he had any right to be. But there are some that believe that without Day-Lewis’ phenomenal performance, the rest of the movie isn’t that good. I respectfully disagree, as there is enough brilliance behind the camera to match what is happening onscreen. Very few movies of the 21st century have attained the amount of technical mastery that Paul Thomas Anderson assembles here. One of the most notable attributes of There Will Be Blood is that of the cinematography by Robert Elswitt, which also nabbed an Academy Award. Many intimate conversations are characterized by focused close-up shots of the character most pivotal in that scenario. Even when someone else is talking, the camera refuses to cut or pan away from the primary subject, allowing us to get a better sense of closeness to these individuals. These harsh close-ups are contrasted by anamorphic wide shots of the gorgeous and vast frontier waiting to be dried up of oil. One of the most memorable sequences occurs near the end of the first act when Plainview discovers a whole ocean worth of oil beneath one of his large mines. As it continues to erupt from the late afternoon into the dark evening, a fire is lit near the top of it all. You see him as well as all of his employees drenched in black oil and soot as well as a beautiful coloring of orange firelight. Meanwhile, former Radiohead lead guitarist Jonny Greenwood composes the musical score for this film, making this the first in five movies he has collaborated with Paul Thomas Anderson. Although it uses a lot of preexisting material, there is still quite a bit of new stuff to gouge down on. Often it’s just little bits of ambient strings that heighten the tension of a scene or when various percussion instruments are banged together in a cacophonic manner that is as raucous as it is poetic. In the vein of all his other work, though, There Will Be Blood is much more than just an excuse for Anderson to direct someone in a way that might earn them an Oscar. Much like a strip of barren land in Southern California, there is a lot of precious stuff to appreciate and dig for underneath the surface. In this case, we see the ideas of American capitalism and natural greed deconstructed to their very cores. During this period, some Americans had idolized Titans in this industry such as John D. Rockefeller. But this film does its very best to illustrate that these “heroes” at the turn of the century were anything but considerate, let alone worth idolizing. With Daniel Plainview’s ambitions and lust for wealth growing ever so much, he becomes more disconnected from everyone around him, thus making him more ruthless and dangerous. Similarly, Eli is so dead-set on acquiring this oil that he uses any justification, including and especially religion, to get it. There Will Be Blood is a believable meditation on greed with one stunning performance at the center of it all. It’s a damn shame that Daniel Day-Lewis has retired from acting because there really is no other thespian like him in the industry. May he enjoy his days in peace.

Image result for there will be blood poster

“The Prestige” Movie Review

Thought it would make sense to review some of Christopher Nolan’s best films in preparation for Dunkirk this July. I’ve already done Interstellar, though, I’m tempted to do an update. You can expect the Dark Knight Trilogy to show up soon, as well as Inception, but let’s begin with one of his more overlooked projects. This magic-based mystery thriller was able to triple its $40 million budget after its premiere October of 2006. Released just after Batman Begins, it also marks a rare time when Nolan adapted a pre-existing material, as it was based on the novel by Christopher Priest. Set in 1890’s London, the incredibly complex story follows two magicians, Robert Angier and Alfred Borden, who compete with each other to create the greatest stage illusion imaginable. Their game of one-upmanship turns into a series of tragedies. Of course, this being a film by Christopher Nolan, the PG-13 rated plot is much more involved and layered than that, and some really mind-bending stuff happens. Hugh Jackman is the real star of this film as Robert Angier, with all the charisma and showmanship that most real-life magicians lack. The things that happen to him are very sad and damaging. And as he goes down the path of competition, he begins to lose sight of what got him on that path to start. Continuing their relationship with the director, Michael Caine and Christian Bale are fabulous in their roles. Unlike many of his other films, Bale is actually allowed to retain his British accent, which added more heft to his emotional punch. Caine, meanwhile, plays a disconnected mentor who essentially works as a mediator between the two magicians. His wisdom is reminiscent of Alfred Pennyworth from the Dark Knight Trilogy, as he seems to be the one person who wants both of these men to settle their feud. The strong supporting cast includes Scarlett Johannson, Piper Perabo, Rebecca Hall, Ricky Jay, a rare live-action stint from Andy Serkis, and the late musician David Bowie. Bowie is particularly enigmatic as a man with many secrets on how to make a show even more dazzling than it already is. But he doesn’t use magic, he uses science. To go any further into any of these actors’ characters would spoil the plot. One of the things Nolan is known for is how all of his films are not what they initially appear to be. For example, his first directorial outing Following looked like a cheap student film, (And it kind of was) but turned out to be a focused and engaging mystery thriller. With The Prestige, he crafts a compelling narrative out of a subject that shouldn’t be that interesting; stage magicians. Through his trademark storytelling techniques, the story doesn’t initially progress in chronological order and jumps around in time. This makes the film even more intriguing and keeps the audience guessing from start to finish. Another trademark of Nolan’s is how practical and technically brilliant his films are. The production and costume designs are all top-notch and help it feel like a gritty and lived-in 1890’s London. When Borden or Angiers are on-stage, it feels as if we are actually watching a magic show unfold before our eyes. And the visuals are nice as well. In one scene, Angiers is standing in the middle of a snowy ridge when all of a sudden, these fluorescent lights come out. It added more beauty, atmosphere, and mystique to the 130 minute-long picture, topped by Wally Pfister’s surreal camera work. As pretty much the last film before Nolan’s long-term collaboration with Hans Zimmer, the musical score in The Prestige is provided by David Julyan. It is often consisting of eery synthesizers building up in a crescendo, punctuated by a shocking set of strings in revealing moments. And there are many. Holy mother of God, there are revealing moments. Like a traditional magic show, the film is broken up into three intertwined acts. The first two are impressive feats of visual flair and emotionally engaging performances. But in the final act, a jaw-dropping plot twist is thrown in to pull the rug from underneath the audience in a way that is both shocking and brilliantly believable. Were you watching closely? I was, and it worked. Without giving away anything, the twist also brought to light the philosophical themes hidden just beneath the crust. Because these two characters are neck-and-neck, they often give in to their inner ambitions and obsession. That obession to become the greatest at their profession leads to many bad outcomes and ultimately makes them less humane. To put it in the words of David Bowie’s character, “You’re familiar with the phrase ‘man’s reach exceeds his grasp?’ It’s a lie; man’s grasp exceeds his nerve.” If you love the type of movies that make you think about the story and maybe even tempt you to watch it again to make sure you didn’t miss anything, you need not look any further than The Prestige. It blends seamless production and technical merits and fantastic performance with breathtaking precision. This is a very underrated piece of humanistic filmmaking that deserves all the recognition as Christopher Nolan’s other endeavors have endured.

Image result for the prestige

“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” Movie Review

And this is how to make a movie that is truly deserving of Best Picture. This provocative drama from director Milos Forman and producer Michael Douglas was released by United Artists on November 9th, 1975, earning back over $100 million on a small budget of $4.4 million total. Today, it is rated as the 16th greatest movie of all time on IMDb and listed as one of the late Roger Ebert’s favorite films. Based on the controversial novel by Ken Kesey- who apparently hated the finished product –One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest recounts the story of Randle McMurphy, an ex-con who transfers to a mental hospital in order to avoid more jail time. Once there, he falls into a trance when he’s introduced to a system where patients are heavily medicated, physically abused, and treated with almost no empathy. He begins to encourage the suppressed patients to fight back against Nurse Ratched’s tyrannical, bullying rule. Recently, I read the book this film was based on as part of a course examining the most challenged novels in American literature. And yes, there are many moments where artistic license is taken with the source material by screenwriters Lawrence Hauben and Bo Goldman, particularly of the point-of-view with the story. But I’m not here to nitpick the differences in the adaptation, I’m here to dissect this simply as a movie on its own. And on its own, this has to be one of the best pictures released in the 1970’s. In the performance that launched his storied career, Jack Nicholson is absolutely electrifying as Randle McMurphy. This basically set the groundwork for all of his crazy roles to follow, from the Joker to Frank Costello. But none were as memorable or arguably as likable as his work in this film. Slightly older than him, Louise Fletcher is completely heartless and uncaring as Nurse Ratched. Male or female, she has to be one of the most despicable characters in film history. Her rule emulates that of any infamous world dictator, manipulating every patient and staff member with careful words. The film also features early roles from Danny DeVito, Christopher Lloyd, and an Oscar-nominated performance from Brad Dourif as a stuttering man-child. Will Sampson as Chief Bromden, the narrator of the original book, is also worth noting. His captivating portrayal of a deaf-mute is a unique depiction of modern Native Americans and remains one of the most memorable fictional ones on the celluloid. Although sparsely present, what there is of Jack Nitzche’s score is beautiful. The film opens and ends on the same track with steady percussion and a high voice, punctuated by goosebump-inducing strings. It’s the kind of soundtrack that gives one hope for their lives and makes you want to live life to the fullest; the primary theme of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. The camera work by Haskell Wexler and Bill Butler is rather dry. Often the action will be shown in short cuts of editing. Other times it will keep on one shot to emulate the feeling that we truly are inside this mental hospital. Such a moment occurs late in the picture when after a large celebration, the camera focuses in on Randle. He’s not partying, not monologuing about his past. Just a static shot of him drinking a beer while sitting down, silently smiling at his accomplishments. It is this silent simplicity that helps give this film its advantage and likability. But that doesn’t mean that One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is always fun and lighthearted. There are some moments that are so powerful that you can hardly finish. The actors and extras did a supreme job at making the environment as realistic as possible. But the portrayal of mental illness, and of the authority that tries to exploit it, is so raw and unpretentious that it sometimes borders on hard-to-watch. From challenged patients who refuse to take their medication to electroshock therapy for those who resist, the movie pulls almost no punches. Which is probably why it went on to win the Big Five Oscars. These were Academy Awards for Best Actor, Actress, Screenplay, Director, and Picture. One of the rarest feats in the Academy’s history, to win all of these categories in one night is a truly astonishing achievement. And this is a film that really did earn all of it. It also has an ending that can make you feel teary-eyed from both sadness and joy. All I can say is that you will have the feel the feeling of you were graduating. With unforgettable characters, realistic dialogue, fantastic performances and a great sense of dark optimism, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is an uncompromising and captivating look at standing up to your oppressors. It may not quite be perfect as a whole, but the smaller moments are the ones that truly make it what it is. It is hard to watch sometimes and to rewatch but it’s absolutely worth it to get a better understanding of mental illness and the will to survive in the face of adversity.

Image result for one flew over the cuckoo's nest

“Sophie’s Choice” Movie Review

And we all thought that there was no way Julie Andrews in Mary Poppins could be matched in performance. Released in the fall of 1982, this drama received both critical and commercial success just in time for awards season. After leaving his small-town home in the South, aspiring novelist Stingo moves into a shared boarding house in Brooklyn in 1947. Soon after settling in, he meets his upstairs neighbors, Polish immigrant Sophie Zawistowski and pharmaceutical worker Nathan Landau. While they immediately become the best of friends, Sophie and Stingo must brave Nathan’s emotionally tempestuous behavior and violent mood swings. It’s only a matter of time before Sophie trusts Stingo enough to share her harrowing experiences in a Nazi concentration camp during World War II. As the synopsis suggests, Stingo acts as our primary point of view for much of the runtime. A young man in his 20’s, his inexperience in the large city of New York, and his desire to understand human love allows the audience to relate to him in his struggles. When he discovers new locations across the city, it’s as if we’re walking in his shoes, seeing what he sees, learning what he learns. The city is a massively scary place for someone of small town background like Stingo, almost as if it wants to suck you in and never let you leave. The desired effect worked well for the most part. That being said, it felt as though the scope was very restricted. Most of the turbulent scenes are told inside of the characters’ boarding house, only one floor apart from each other. In that, it sometimes felt more like a stage play on Broadway, with nondescript locations and a plot that mostly develops from various characters exchanging bits of dialogue. One notable exception to this occurs early on in the picture when the trio goes to Coney Island for a day. While they move through a variety of different rides and attractions, the whole sequence plays like a silent film with color without any verbal or background noise. We only see these three people have the best day of their life, backed by Marvin Hamlisch’s beautiful and subtle score. This is undeniably creative, but it sometimes felt unappealing. However, Alan Pakula makes up for this in the latter half of Sophie’s Choice, when we start getting glimpses and flashbacks of Sophie’s life in Auschwitz. Many colors are desaturated or muted, similar in style to Steven Spielberg’s later Holocaust film Schindler’s List. It is clear that as the situation becomes bleaker, the colors fade even more. To add further authenticity, a rather large portion of the film is spoken in either Polish or German, a choice that throws me into the admittedly conventional drama. This is contrasted by scenes of Sophie explaining her every action in the present day to Stingo. These cutaways to the modern setting are filmed in a first-person perspective, giving the impression that we are listening to her talk to us in person. This allows the audience to better relate to her and her story; especially in the final act when everything comes to a gut-wrenching head. All three leads are terrific in their respective roles. Peter MacNicol, in his second movie ever, does convincing work as Stingo. Right at home with his Texan accent, his naive demeanor and great ambitions make him a man of great compassion. While he may be better known for comedies such as A Fish Called Wanda, Kevin Kline is fantastic as Nathan Landau. An unpredictable paranoid schizophrenic, some scenes were just uncomfortable to watch. But he’s still an indelible figure to look up to and find some warmth in, like when he first met Sophie and they bonded over reading Emily Dickinson poems. Or later, when he declares in a touching monolog that Stingo is destined to become one of the great American writers, alongside Whitman and Wolfe. But the true standout, as you may already know, is Meryl Streep, who completely deserved her Academy Award for Best Actress. It really can’t be overstated how incredible she is. Aside from her near-perfect Polish accent, she manages to hit almost every single emotion imaginable. She bounces between joy, anger, confusion, and unspeakable sadness with ease. If anyone else was cast as the titular character, this performance (as well as the movie) would probably be forgettable. Aside from being an experiment in acting and emotions, there is a point and meaningful purpose in the story of Sophie’s Choice. Through the eyes of Stingo, we are subject to the capacity one man (or woman) has for both love and suffering. When Sophie first arrives at the concentration camp, she is forced by an SS Officer to choose: will her son or her daughter go to the gas chambers? This is nothing easy for anyone. While she has endured so much pain, she still finds the ability to love other people. No matter how many times Nathan hits her, they keep reconciling and rekindling their relationship. There are brief moments of humor, like Sophie incorrectly mistaking Stingo’s seersuckers for “cocksuckers.” But aside from small moments like that, this film is not uplifting, or even very enjoyable to watch. By the time the credits start to roll, you will be left either speechless in your seat or in ugly tears of sadness. Maybe even both. If you aren’t brought to either one of those states, then it’s questionable if you’re truly human. Although it may be too upsetting for some and a little too conventional for its own good, Sophie’s Choice is a fantastically written and beautifully poignant drama about the distinction between love and suffering. It features one of the greatest performances ever put to film and an ending that will haunt viewers for many weeks after.

Image result for sophie's choice

“Gravity” Movie Review

If this movie proves anything, it’s this: there is absolutely no excuse for terrible CGI in film anymore. We’re past that. This extremely ambitious science-fiction action thriller from acclaimed director Alfonso Cuaron grossed over 7 times its $100 million budget after it debuted in America on October 4th, 2013 and in the UK a month later. Co-written with his son Jonas and produced by Harry Potter showrunner David Heyman, the PG-13-rated story follows a crew of astronauts whose space shuttle is destroyed at mid-orbit during a mission on their space shuttle Explorer. Miraculously in one piece, Dr. Ryan Stone, played by Sandra Bullock, finds herself stranded in space and now must find a way to safely return to the surface of Earth… or float out into the dark and cold void of outer space forever. I can’t talk much more about the plot because none of the trailers ever gave anything away, and- true story -I had never actually seen Gravity until a few hours ago. Hang me from the gallows for heresy, but now I know what I’ve been missing out on for the past four years. As pretty much the only two characters who ever show their faces, Sandra Bullock and George Clooney carry this movie on their shoulders- or more appropriately, launch it to great heights. Clooney more or less plays a caricatured, astronaut version of himself, always quipping to his crew members and sharing amusing stories about himself. He gave this film humor where it needed it, and also served as the true optimist when everything suddenly goes wrong. Bullock’s performance is the real standout, though, showing a strong versatile range of emotions. She is thrown into the worst situation imaginable but still has to find the will to get through it alive. A moment late in the movie when she prays to herself marks a pivotal turning point for her tragic character while also being very moving. It also earned her a nomination for Best Actress, marking this as the first time a sci-fi action film has been nominated in the category since Sigourney Weaver in Aliens. The film has also received a fair amount of criticism for a number of scientific inaccuracies, particularly when the Laws of Physics are broken. This is not necessarily a negative. In fact, it should be considered a high honor if a science-fiction film falls under scrutiny for the science portrayed. Implausible? Sometimes. But it’s still believably demonstrated and explained. While on the subject, in a technical sense, this is a flawless movie with no missteps whatsoever. Oscar-winning cinematographer Emmanual Lubezki utilizes his trademark of long-tracking shots to great and innovative effect. The film opens with a single, fluid 13-minute shot that establishes everything that is to come. In fact, there are huge passages taken from a single-camera shot, swinging around the stations and suits with ease. These huge takes are contrasted by claustrophobic point-of-view shots from inside Ryan Stone’s space suit, truly giving the impression that the audience is stuck in orbit with her. Meanwhile, Steven Price’s soundtrack is an astonishing, atmospheric score with pulsating electronic drums and illustrious strings. Lone shots of the Sun horizon are emulated by an ambient, almost esoteric noise. But it’s the vocal accompaniment from Katherine Ellis on the last two tracks that make such an inspirational award-winner. Speaking of vocals, further immersing audiences into its adventure is the intricate sound design. Since it took place in outers space, almost everything that happened was silent- a tactic which turned out to be very frightening for me. Much of the radio chatter between the astronauts and Houston Mission Control is babble over a channel of static, and- even more impressive -the film made your hear everything the characters were hearing. So whenever a screw was being put into a metal plate, it felt like her head was tilted to the side, causing only one ear to hear it all. The only real way to watch and appreciate this film at home is on a widescreen T.V. with the lights out and the sound turned way up. It’s just a rich experience. Even richer than that, as many have raved about nonstop, the visual effects in Gravity are simply stunning and beautiful. Having the majority of a movie focus almost entirely outside in space, and make it look realistic at the same time, was concept believed to be impossible just a decade ago. But Framestore utilized every ounce of its budget over the course of three meticulous years, deservedly earning it the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects. Unfolding seemingly over real-time, this movie serves as a benchmark for how far we’ve come in technology and the possibilities of where we might go from here. My only gripe is that I was never able to see this in IMAX 3-D, which many professed was one of the greatest cinematic experiences they had ever had. Though, honestly, I think I might have gotten sick if I did. Even so, I am perfectly content watching the relaxing image of Earth pass in the background as our heroes move from one disaster to the next. To put it in the words of Clooney, “Gotta admit one thing. You can’t beat the view.” He’s right, nothing can. Despite its inaccuracies regarding science and physics, Gravity is an intense and unbelievably captivating adventure with great thrills. Easily the most visually impressive film since 2009’s Avatar, and certainly of this decade so far, there is not a moment of this movie that ever lets up and it never gets boring. The mile-a-minute 90 minute-long picture is an astonishing visual masterpiece that left me breathless and amazed.

Image result for gravity movie

“Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi” Trailer Analysis and Speculation

*Disclaimer: The following post contains huge spoilers from the events of Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens. If you have not yet seen the movie… stick around cause you need this.

Happy Easter weekend to all of you. Speaking of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, we now have our first official teaser trailer for Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi. This is actually what consider to be a late reaction. I’ve watched the trailer roughly 88 times, and after carefully looking at each frame, I’m ready to give my thoughts. It begins with what we initially believe to be the stars of the galaxy before the frame fades into a rock. We then see Rey falls down onto it, breathless with something she has just witnessed. My guess is that she has just experienced a Force vision that Luke Skywalker has given to her as part of her training. In fact, much of this trailer is spent showing some of Rey’s time on the mysterious planet of Ach-To, training with the self-exiled Jedi. One shot shows her approaching a shelf of old books at the center of an old tree. This makes me think that she will not only be learning the ways of The Force, but also its history and how the Jedi and the Sith have been fighting for eons over the same cause. When it isn’t, it cuts over to quick cuts of the Resistance trying to hold its own against the might of the First Order. Seriously, we see what looks to be a fighter hanger get destroyed and the Resistance fleet is under an intense space combat scenario. That’s actually something I’m looking forward to most because it’s been a long while since we’ve seen a real space battle in the Saga films. And now, with improvements in technology and visual effects, I’m eager to see it all unfold. The thing I’m looking forward to the most, however, is how different of a movie this will be from the others. As much as I loved The Force Awakens, it’s impossible for me to deny how similar it was to A New Hope in terms of the plot and character development. Well, writer-director Rian Johnson has repeatedly professed that The Last Jedi will try to distinguish itself as much as it can from the other entries in the franchise. And of course, the trailer is filled with an epic montage of awesome, with zero context given for any of it. Why, you might ask? To keep the plot in the dark, obviously. The people in charge of marketing these films bend over backwards to ensure that the movies remain shrouded in secrecy and that absolutely nothing about the plot is revealed until the release this December. But that doesn’t stop us fans from scrutinizing every single frame of the trailer(s) while we still can. In this montage, Finn is shown to be asleep in a ship during hyperspace. I’m very curious to see what the Resistance plans to do with him in this film, as John Boyega has been very mum on information regarding his character’s new arc. Still, considering that this film begins immediately after The Force Awakens ended, it wouldn’t be surprising that he’s still recovering from his battle wounds with Kylo Ren. Speaking of Kylo Ren, who else saw that shot of his helmet completely destroyed on the ground? And later we see a tiny glimpse of him pointing his jagged crossguard lightsaber at someone. Something tells me that not only are we getting a new costume from him, but also more internal conflict. Because if you saw the previously film, you’ll remember that he was both literally scarred in battle and torn between his allegiance to The Force. But the real star of this teaser trailer is the star of the original Star Wars trilogy, Luke Skywalker. I was one of the only people who felt satisfied by his 30-second cameo at the end of The Force Awakens, and now it’s established that he’ll be taking center stage. His voice-over is heard throughout the 90 second-long teaser, mostly telling Rey how to prepare for her training of the ways of The Force. But then it takes 180 turn when he mysteriously announces, “I know only one truth. It’s time for the Jedi to end.” Which is something I’ve been thinking about for a while now. Most of the Force users in the galaxy are dead now, and the ones that aren’t are nearly spent on their energy. Maybe by the time that Episode IX ends, every Force user from both the Light Side and the Dark Side will die and there will be no more religion or space magic. Just the age of technology. Some ask me why I do this, and I have answer for you: Because it’s fun to theorize! That’s the purpose of the Internet: Criticism, speculation, and entertainment- sometimes all wrapped into one package. I can’t wait to see how The Last Jedi unfolds when it hits theaters on December 15th. Have you seen the teaser trailer? What are your thoughts on it and your theories?” This is definitely a trailer worth talking about. Put your thoughts in the Comments, and if you want more cool content like this, be sure to Like and Follow my Blog.

Image result for the last jedi poster

“Mass Effect 3” Game Review

And now, we come to the end of the trilogy. The third installment in Bioware’s epic science-fiction action-RPG franchise launched on March 6th, 2012, selling over 3.5 million copies in the first quarter of its release. Unlike the two previous games, this one was released on all major systems at launch, even getting a Wii-U port which- I’ll tell you right now -is grossly inferior in controls and visuals to its counterparts. Set a mere 6 months after Mass Effect 2, Commander Shepard has been grounded on Earth for his/her involvement with Cerberus. Right when his trial begins, the Reapers- ancient hyper-advanced machines floating in the dark space -begin their cyclical purge of the Milky Way Galaxy’s organic life, starting with Earth. Barely escaping by the skin of his/her teeth, Shepard and the crew Normandy make a mad dash across the galaxy to rally as many allies as possible, while Admiral Anderson holds down the fort with the human resistance. So this game is a mixed bag if ever there was one. Let me be clear: Mass Effect 3 is a great game and deserves to be played, but some of the controversies it caused are earned. Let’s start with the gameplay because it is perhaps the best in the series. Expanding on the cover-based combat from the second game, you’re given more ways to approach a gunfight than before. And that’s partially thanks to the improvements made to the guns, as well as the addition of new ones. Rather than overheating, it does rely on ammo. Word of advice: the 2 guns you want to use the most are the shotgun and the sniper rifle, simply because they’re the most powerful against enemies. Much of the action is shown from an over-the-shoulder perspective, so when you jump over cover or run across the room, the camera is shaking. This made the experience feel more cinematic, really placing you in the middle of an intense war zone with almost no way out. Mass Effect 3 does get rid of the loyalty missions for your teammates, but this is supplemented with various side-quests and activities. This feeds into the feature of War Assets. The more you complete, the higher your reputation will climb and the more aliens commit to your cause. A good chunk of time is also spent onboard the Citadel, where millions of refugees are housed in the docking bays and politicians can’t figure out what to do. Considering the events unfolding in Syria and the controversial executive order signed as a response, the game couldn’t be more timely in its themes of unity and prejudice. The soundtrack, composed by Clint Mansell and a handful of others, is beautiful and unforgettable. The score utilizes a simple piano melody established at the very beginning, when Shepard is forced off Earth as the Reapers slaughter much of innocent human life, as the backbone for many of the tracks. By far, it’s one of the most memorable emotional suites I’ve ever heard in a video game. And yes, Mass Effect 3 is a super turbulent ride of dichotomous emotions; hope to despair, joy to sadness, optimism to desperation, but all human. This is a war, and it isn’t pretty to be a part of. Especially considering the fact that the game really makes the player feel as if the entire fate of the Milky Way Galaxy rests on your own shoulders. So the choices you make on each mission, main or otherwise, has a relatively big impact on the finale. Also, it’s highly recommended that you play the first two Mass Effect games before starting this one. To be clear, it is possible to jump into this installment fresh, but you won’t have the necessary attachment to the characters. Because some of the things that happen to them in the story are just so tragic, it’s almost hard to watch. Props have to be given to the writers for allowing gamers to feel that kind of emotion. Then, there’s the end. This is the subject of controversy, a lot of fan division, and is polarizing to the point that it makes the series finale of Lost look like it was universally praised. Okay, that’s pushing it, but you get the idea. Basically, at the very pinnacle of the epic climax, you’re given a choice of 3 different endings, each one essentially distinguished by a certain color. I will not fret from saying that I hated the ending of Mass Effect 3, and was one of many people who demanded something different. While Bioware refused to change it outright, they did throw us a bone with a rewritten Extended Cut. It added much more resolution to the conflict and its aftermath and added an additional 4th ending, that was a far more pessimistic outlook of everything the series has led up to. And honestly, this Extended Cut gave me everything I wanted the first time, and I’m interested to see how Andromeda uses the different outcomes in the story. Despite that somewhat anticlimactic ending, Mass Effect 3 is an overall fitting conclusion to one of the best science-fiction epics you’ll find in any media out there. Also worth noting, get the “From Ashes” DLC with it, as it adds new missions and one of the most fascinating crew members in the series. One of the most emotional and unforgettable trilogies in the history of video games, you’d be a fool to miss out on it.

Image result for mass effect 3