Category Archives: Family

“The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part” Movie Review

One has to wonder what Solo: A Star Wars Story would have looked like if Lord and Miller had actually finished it their way. I know that’s very cliched thing to say now, but I just can’t help but be mighty curious, especially with something like this and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. This computer-animated comedy adventure was theatrically released on February 8th, 2019, almost exactly 5 years since its predecessor. While it has grossed over $103.8 million at the worldwide box office thus far, given its $99 million budget, it performed under expectations for the studio. In fact, some are debating whether it will be able to turn a real profit by the end of its theatrical run. That being said, it has still received fairly positive response from audiences and critics, albeit a little less so than the first film in the series. Directed by Mike Mitchell, the original film’s creators Phil Lord and Christopher Miller return to produce and write the screenplay. The biggest creative hurdle they faced during production was seamlessly and successfully moving between the headspace and imagination of the human children. There were also a number of brand new Lego mini-figures created specifically for the film, many of which were made with the subject’s permission. Taking place 5 years after the events of the original, the vast and diverse world of Bricksburg has been turned into Apocalypseburg after an invasion from Duplo bricks. Master Builder Emmet Brickowski, voiced by Chris Pratt is struggling to adjust his attitude to the hardened tone of many of his world’s inhabitants, including his girlfriend Lucy/ Wyldstyle, voiced by Elizabeth Banks. One day, an alien named General Mayhem kidnaps Lucy and various other Master Builders and takes them to a brand new place called the Systar System. Racing against time to save them, Emmet gets some unexpected help along the way from a mysterious galaxy-defending, raptor-training cowboy named Rex Dangervest. I absolutely loved The Lego Movie from 2014 and it remains one of the biggest cinematic surprises I’ve ever seen. Although I genuinely regret missing it in theaters, it proved everyone who thought it would be terrible wrong by providing fast-paced humor and a surprisingly thoughtful story to go along. Not to mention, it’s proven to be an incredibly rewatchable movie with tons of cool references and jokes to find each new time. And while I enjoyed The Lego Batman Movie and The Lego Ninjago Movie, I was waiting eagerly for a proper sequel to that modern classic. Whether or not it would actually live up to the first one is a bit unfair, since its predecessor had the element of surprise whereas this one became highly anticipated. And the answer is no, The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part is ultimately not as good the second time around. But still, it’s a very entertaining animated romp with plenty of humor and action to keep viewers preoccupied for 107 minutes. What’s most surprising about this sequel is how it doesn’t seem interested in retreading old ground or repeating what happened last time. Instead, Lord and Miller attempt to move things forward in a relevant way, finding time to address new topics. Whereas the previous one was a thinly veiled critique of capitalism and anti-copyright law, The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part is more of an indictment of toxic masculinity. Emmet has no idea how to be tough and strong in a world so fundamentally weary of itself, and when he tries it ultimately hurts both him and his loved ones. As one character points out, “It’s easy to harden your heart, but opening it up is one of the hardest things we can do.” Liking things that were meant for kids or staying upbeat in dark times is never a thing to feel ashamed of, no matter what others may tell you. Chris Pratt pulls double duty, both returning as Emmet Brickowski and voicing his self-parody as Rex Dangervest. They present a fun and interesting duality of his career; one is the lovable everyday guy who doesn’t think too much, the other is a badass, self-serious action hero. Tiffany Haddish is among the newer additions to the cast and is more than welcome. As Queen Watevra Wa’Nabi, a shape-shifting alien monarch ruling over the Duplos, she is every bit as witty and hilarious as she is in many of her other live-action roles. Pretty much all of the voice cast from the first film reprise their roles here and are still perfect. These include Will Arnett as Bruce Wayne/Batman, Elizabeth Banks as the troubled girlfriend Lucy, Charlie Day as the spaceship-obsessed astronaut Benny, Nick Offerman as the cantankerous pirate MetalBeard, and Allison Brie as the feisty and unpredictable Unikitty. Other newcomers include Brooklyn Nine-Nine‘s Stephanie Beatriz as the deadpan General Mayhem, who is not what she first appears to be. Hearing her speak awkward lines in a menacingly robotic voice had me and the audience in stitches numerous times. And when it comes to the technical aspects, The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part is extremely impressive and polished. One thing I love about this series is that even though it’s computer-animated, they go through an insane amount of motions to make it look like stop-motion. That continues here with gloriously smooth textures and a wide-ranging color palette. The level of detail in each individual shot is almost unreal, with virtually everything on-screen- including explosions, water splashes, and dust clouds -resembling Lego pieces. Mark Mothersbaugh, who previously composed for the first entry in the franchise, once again provides the instrumental film score. Much like last time, it’s a whimsical one befitting of the sweeping and wacky adventure shown on-screen. It’s a very diverse and wide-ranging sound, with instruments like synthesizers, percussion, and strings going back and forth over who controls the melody. It’s highly suspenseful and thrilling for the action scenes and more calm or moody when establishing the setting, including the Mad Max parody of Apocalypseburg. And also like the first film, the soundtrack features a couple of earworms out of original songs. The most obvious one this time around is “Catchy Song” by Dillon Francis, T-Pain and That Girl Lay Lay. It’s a musical number which literally promises in its lyrics that it will get stuck inside your head, and it does. But there’s also a somber redux of the original’s “Everything is Awesome” into “Everything’s Not Awesome.” Hearing the whole cast sing it in the tired world of 2019 was something I never expected I would need to hear. Utilizing a new line of characters and choosing new themes to address, even if it doesn’t always stick the landing, The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part is a playful reminder of kid-like wonder and fun. Miller and Lord continue to do wonders with ideas that should be absolutely terrible on paper, but end up being highly entertaining for broad audiences. And while the messaging and plot may not be as clever in this sequel as its predecessor, it’s still a welcome one. In these dark and scary times, everything isn’t awesome- and that’s okay, and we shouldn’t let that force us to change ourselves.

Advertisements

Final 2019 Oscar Predictions

After nearly a whole year’s worth of screw-ups, terrible announcements, last-minute changes, and other controversial matters, the 91st Academy Awards are finally upon us. And as was with last year, I managed to see nearly all of the major contenders from last year in preparation for this one night. While there are more frontrunners this year than previous expected, I still have some thoughts about who I think will win in all 24 categories (Which will THANKFULLY be all aired live) as well as who I think better deserves it. Also like last year, I took the liberty of including some films I really thought deserved a nod in a category that were ultimately snubbed. And remember, regardless of how it turns out or if we even like it, the ceremony airs this Sunday, February 24th.

Best Picture

Will Win: Roma

Could Win: Green Book

Should Win: Roma

Should Have Been Nominated: If Beale Street Could Talk

 

Best Director

Will Win: Alfonso Cuarón for Roma

Could Win: Spike Lee for BlacKKKlansman

Should Win: Alfonso Cuarón for Roma

Should Have Been Nominated: Marielle Heller for Can You Ever Forgive Me?

 

Best Actor

Will Win: Rami Malek in Bohemian Rhapsody

Could Win: Christian Bale in Vice

Should Win: Bradley Cooper in A Star is Born

Should Have Been Nominated: Joaquin Phoenix in You Were Never Really Here

 

Best Actress

Will Win: Glenn Close in The Wife

Could Win: Olivia Coleman in The Favourite

Should Win: Olivia Coleman in The Favourite

Should Have Been Nominated: Viola Davis in Widows

 

Best Supporting Actor

Will Win: Sam Elliot in A Star is Born

Could Win: Mahershala Ali in Green Book

Should Win: Sam Elliot in A Star is Born

Should Have Been Nominated: Michael B. Jordan in Black Panther

 

Best Supporting Actress

Will Win: Regina King in If Beale Street Could Talk

Could Win: Rachel Weisz in The Favourite

Should Win: Regina King in If Beale Street Could Talk

Should Have Been Nominated: Tilda Swinton in Suspiria

 

Best Original Screenplay

Will Win: The Favourite

Could Win: Green Book

Should Win: Roma

Should Have Been Nominated: Sorry to Bother You

 

Best Adapted Screenplay

Will Win: BlacKKKlansman

Could Win: A Star is Born

Should Win: BlacKKKlansman

Should Have Been Nominated: Widows

 

Best Animated Feature Film

Will Win: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Could Win: Incredibles 2

Should Win: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Should Have Been Nominated: Teen Titans Go! to the Movies

 

Best Foreign-Language Film

Will Win: Roma (Mexico)

Could Win: Cold War (Poland)

Should Win: Roma (Mexico)

Should Have Been Nominated: Border (Sweden)

 

Best Documentary- Feature

Will Win: Free Solo

Could Win: Minding the Gap

Should Win: RBG

Should Have Been Nominated: Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

 

Best Documentary- Short Subject

Will Win: A Night at the Garden

Could Win: Period. End of a Sentence

Should Win: A Night at the Garden

Should Have Been Nominated: Zion

 

Best Live-Action Short Film

Will Win: Fauve

Could Win: Detainment

Should Win: Fauve

Should Have Been Nominated: One Cambodian Family Please For My Pleasure

 

Best Animated Short

Will Win: Bao

Could Win: Late Afternoon

Should Win: Bao

Should Have Been Nominated: The Ostrich Politic

 

Best Original Score

Will Win: Black Panther by Ludwig Göransson

Could Win: If Beale Street Could Talk by Nicholas Britell

Should Win: Black Panther by Ludwig Göransson

Should Have Been Nominated: First Man by Justin Hurwitz

 

Best Original Song

Will Win: “Shallow” from A Star is Born

Could Win: “All the Stars” from Black Panther

Should Win: “Shallow” from A Star is Born

Should Have Been Nominated: “Hearts Beat Loud” from Hearts Beat Loud

 

Best Visual Effects

Will Win: First Man

Could Win: Ready Player One

Should Win: First Man

Should Have Been Nominated: Mission: Impossible- Fallout

 

Best Cinematography

Will Win: Roma

Could Win: A Star is Born

Should Win: Roma

Should Have Been Nominated: Widows

 

Best Costume Design

Will Win: Black Panther

Could Win: The Favourite

Should Win: The Favourite

Should Have Been Nominated: Paddington 2

 

Best Makeup and Hairstyle

Will Win: Vice

Could Win: Border

Should Win: Vice

Should Have Been Nominated: Suspiria

 

Best Production Design

 

Will Win: The Favourite

Could Win: Black Panther

Should Win: First Man

Should Have Been Nominated: Annihilation

 

Best Film Editing

Will Win: Vice

Could Win: Bohemian Rhapsody

Should Win: BlacKKKlansman

Should Have Been Nominated: Hereditary

 

Best Sound Mixing

Will Win: A Star is Born

Could Win: Bohemian Rhapsody

Should Win: Roma

Should Have Been Nominated: Mission: Impossible- Fallout

 

Best Sound Editing

Will Win: Roma

Could Win: A Quiet Place

Should Win: Roma

Should Have Been Nominated: Mission: Impossible- Fallout

 

Do you have thoughts or predictions of your own? What films do you think will, could, or should win in each category? What are some that you feel got snubbed by the Oscars? Be sure to leave a Comment on it below, and if you like what you see here, be sure to Like this post and Follow my Blog for similar film-centric content.

“Shoplifters” Movie Review

Have you ever wondered what a dose of so-called “tough love” would feel like in cinematic form? By my estimate, this film is about as close to that feeling as we’re likely to get for the foreseeable future. This Japanese family drama originally premiered as part of the official competition selection for the 2018 Cannes Film Festival. It ultimately went on to win the coveted Palme d’Or, the first Japanese film to do so in 21 years. After screening at a handful of fall festivals such as TIFF and AFI, Magnolia Pictures released in the United States on November 23rd, 2018, with an expanded rollout in the subsequent weeks. Thus far, it has grossed over $64.8 million at the worldwide box office, including a strong intake from domestic markets, and has received Best Foreign-Language film nominations from both the Golden Globes and the Oscars. Written and directed by Hirokazu Kor-eda, one of the country’s most acclaimed contemporary auteurs, the film had been in his mind for several years with a strong interest in the structure of families. He looked into numerous reports of poverty and was also strongly influenced by the effects of the recent Japanese Recession. Kor-eda also apparently was inspired when he toured a local orphanage and noticed a small girl reading a children’s book by author Leo Lionni. Set in modern-day Tokyo, the 2-hour story focuses on the Shibatas, a dysfunctional and impoverished family who mainly rely on shoplifting and low-end jobs to scrape by. One night on their way home from one of their sessions, father and son Osamu and Shota, played respectively by Lily Franky and Kairi Jō, come across a young girl in the streets. This girl Yuri Hojo, played by Miyu Sasaki, is brought into their home and becomes accustomed to their way of life as the rest of the unit attempts to adjust properly. I had heard of this highly acclaimed film for a long while, mainly since it premiered at Cannes. I’m usually attentive to the big winners at the festival, but this one just seemed fascinating for how different it seemed from films that usually take the major prize. While I’m not familiar with Hirokazu Kor-eda’s work, this film seemed like a more accessible arthouse film than usual. Moreover, my regular theater also partook in a bid where a portion of the proceeds made from the film would be donated to a shelter for the chronically homeless in Austin, Texas. And believe it or not, this actually ended up being the first foreign-language film I’ve seen in theaters. That doesn’t matter though, because Shoplifters is indeed worthy of the Palme d’Or and many of its other accolades it’s been receiving. Truth be told, I’m not very informed on what’s going on in Japan in current events. But judging from this film, and the way Kor-eda handles the subject matter, the socioeconomic conditions of the lower and middle class citizens is about the same as it is here in the U.S. We watch as this one particular family struggles to get by just on the daily, whether it’s earning the bare minimum wage or taking periodical trips to the grocery store just to get some food. What’s most remarkable about Shoplifters is how non-judgmental the whole thing is. All of the characters are damaged individuals, but can also be truly caring and honest. It’s really a breath of fresh air to find a film that treats its characters and ideas with three-dimensionality and respect. In a perfectly cast lead role, Lily Franky leads the pack as the resourceful and witty father Osamu. He may not be well-educated, but he still keeps his wits about him and tries to live by a moral code. When confronted with what he’s taught his children, he simply says, “I can’t think of anything else to teach them.” Newcomers Kairi Jō and Miyu Sasaki also do impressive work as Shota and Yuri, respectively. Despite the griminess and poverty that surrounds them, they manage to stay optimistic and forego the cliched childhood innocence that such characters are usually prone to, although they do try to cling to that. And arguably the biggest scene-stealer of the bunch is Sakura Ando as Nobuyo, Osamu’s hard-working and strong-willed wife. She’s extremely subtle and quiet in her own suffering, but still carries a warmth and radiance that’s hard to shake off. The rest of the family is rounded out by Mayu Matsuoka as the complicated aunt and the director’s frequent collaborator Kirin Kiki as the elderly matriarch of the family, in her final on-screen performance. What’s fascinating is that while we learn quite a bit about each person, there’s still plenty more left open to interpretation. And yet, each actor embodies their character so beautifully like a real, fleshed-out human being. Meanwhile, Shoplifters also manages to showcase Hirokazu Kor-eda as a technical master in control of his craft. Shot on 35 mm celluloid, cinematographer Kondo Ryuto is able to capture the streets of Tokyo in such an authentic and nuanced way. The use of real film creates a crisp grain and texture for the images shown, and is never too showy. It often times follows the characters in little tracking shots and just as easily utilizes intimate, Demme-style close-ups. Meanwhile, the editing is done by Kor-eda himself, who is remarkably patient and careful with his cuts. He knows exactly when to stay on a subject long enough and where to trim out the fat. These include two moving shots of the family playing together at the beach and an extended close-up of Nobuyo processing her actions. Renowned songwriter and musician Haruomi Hosono provides the extremely minimalist film score for this picture, his first in many years. It’s a very sparse soundtrack, comprising only 18 minutes over a 2-hour runtime. But it’s still worth mentioning, as it lacks normal convention- possibly due to its unusually short length. It’s surprisingly piano-heavy in the majority of tracks, and rejects using a real structure or melody to carry through the whole thing. It also uses softer percussion and strings for scenes specifically involving Shota to highlight how much of a difference his world is from his father. With an enormous heart at the center and a naked eye observing issues of poverty and familial connections, Shoplifters is a highly emotional and humanistic drama that engrosses from the start. After watching this film, I’m not surprised in the least by all of the love that it’s received over the last several months. Hirokazu Kor-eda knows just what he’s doing here, and I’m mighty hungry to check out what else he’s done.

Image result for shoplifters poster

“Mary Poppins Returns” Movie Review

This is definitely the second-best movie of the year where Ben Whishaw plays a marmalade-loving character from the city of London. Definitely. This musical fantasy film was theatrically released by Disney around the world on December 19th, 2018. It has thus far grossed over $213 million against an overall budget of $130 million. Although it opened slightly below expectations, its performance improved in the second weekend, holding against strong holiday competition. It has also received mostly positive reviews, as well as a rigorous awards season campaign for the studio, being one of two major live-action players for them. (The other one being Black Panther) Directed by Rob Marshall, who also made Chicago and Into the Woods, a sequel to Disney’s 1964 classic had been gestating in development hell since the mid-1960s. Both Walt Disney himself and eventual CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg attempted to get one off the ground through the 1980s but were constantly stopped by original author P.L. Travers, who famously hated the adaptation. It wasn’t until late 2015 that the studio was finally able to work something out with Travers’ estate and a sequel was finally underway. It closes one of the longest gaps between installments in history, at 54 years difference. Set in 1930s London about 25 years after the events of the original, the Banks children Michael and Jane, played respectively by Ben Whishaw and Emily Mortimer, are all grown up and have grown disillusioned after a family tragedy. When their childhood home is in danger of repossession, their mysterious magical nanny Mary Poppins, played this time by Emily Blunt, suddenly returns to take care of Michael’s 3 children, Georgie, Annabel, and John. While Jane and Michael scramble to save their house, Mary Poppins shows the children truly fantastical ways to help themselves and their family, all the while bonding with Lin-Manuel Miranda’s lamplighter Jack. It’s been many, many years since I last watched Mary Poppins, but I remember loving it as a child. Whether it was Dick Van Dyke’s gamely silly accent or Julie Andrews’ wonderful performance, it had a wide-ranging appeal, even though I definitely wasn’t “into” many musicals at the time. I was somewhat concerned by Disney giving the go-ahead for an official sequel but also felt relieved that it wasn’t just another one of their live-action remakes. Not to mention, while Rob Marshall is a talented director, he often feels more like a journeyman than anything else. And yes, Mary Poppins Returns is very derivative of the first film, but it’s still a delightfully good time at the movies. In fairness to Marshall and screenwriter David Magee, it’s hard not to recreate many of the things that happened plotwise in Mary Poppins Returns. It has an overture and an end credit sequence set against a series of paintings, the two main adults are having familial or financial struggles, the children visit Mary’s cousin instead of her uncle, there’s an extended animation sequence, etc. However, the film mostly makes up for its lack of originality with plenty of British charm and loads of colorful spectacle. It may never be “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious,” but it does a fine job at introducing a new generation to this story and inviting older fans back in. Julie Andrews is perfect as Mary Poppins in the original film, no question, but Emily Blunt is able to measure up on her own with her portrayal. Adopting a proper English accent, she embodies all of the well-mannered and magical qualities that the character possesses. She also has a lovely singing voice and can certainly dance when needed to, and never falters in her job to take care of the Banks children. Opposite her is Lin-Manuel Miranda as Jack, a good-hearted lamplighter. I’m a huge fan of the musical Hamilton and seeing him fulfill his dream of co-leading is quite fun, especially since he shamelessly rocks a bad cockney accent. Ben Whishaw and Emily Mortimer play Jane and Michael Banks all grown up, who do wonderful work with showing the loss of childhood. While they clearly love their family, you can tell that they’re desperate to hold onto the past. Their children are played by Pixies Davies, Joel Lawson, and Nathanael Saleh and are wonderful, while Colin Firth, Julie Walters, Meryl Streep, David Warner, and Angela Lansbury do great work in their small roles. There’s also a single-scene cameo by original star Dick Van Dyke, whose natural warmth and magical presence are oh so welcomed. While both the star and his character are extremely old, that doesn’t stop the 93-year-old from doing what he does best. Hearing his voice and watching him do a softshoe dance routine brought a wave of nostalgia over my heart, and I mean the good kind. Even more impressive, the producers gave him a couple different options for the scene and he chose to do the hardest one without a second thought. He even says, “I may be circling the drain, but I still got a few steps left in me.” I don’t ever want him to die. And being made by Disney, you can count on Mary Poppins Returns to, at the very least, be a technical marvel. Shot by Dion Beebe, who also photographed several of Marshall’s other films, the cinematography is clean and polished. It employs several sweeping shots of the streets of London or wherever the characters are, as well as clever push-ins. Whether they’re singing, dancing, or just simply talking, we’re always able to track their movements in a very fluid manner. This matches up with the editing by Wyatt Smith, which often melds both long takes and more consistent cuts. It often feels put together like a musical from Golden Age of Hollywood. (Which is undoubtedly the point) It’s during these musical numbers that Rob Marshall’s direction shines best because his Broadway background comes through. The staging and lighting are excellent and oh so joyous to watch. Speaking of music, the instrumental film score is composed and conducted by Marc Shaiman. It truly feels like a score for classic Disney, covering many different instruments and arrangements in a lightly-touched way. Huge, boisterous stings and woodwinds are present in almost every track. Others occasionally feel a bit more jazzy with light drumsets and other dynamic percussion instruments such as slide whistles or woodblocks. The original songs are also pretty fun too, albeit maybe not quite as memorable as the ones in the original film. The most popular one appears to “Trip a Little Light Fantastic,” a seven-minute song performed by Miranda, but I personally think that “Can You Imagine That?” deserves attention as well. Both feature great vocals and even better, more elaborate dance routines that were absolutely fun to watch. It’s extremely easy to be cynical about these sort of movies these days. The feel-good, family-friendly musical fantasy has more or less been sneered away from Hollywood for a good while now. It’s true that we may not necessarily need something like this, especially since it’s relying heavily on brand recognition, but it doesn’t hurt to just relax and have a nice time every now and then. Mary Poppins Returns is a charming musical that overcomes its lack of imagination with color and joy. Maybe I’m just growing softer as I get older, but this really worked me over something fierce. Thanks to Emily Blunt, Lin-Manuel Miranda, and a small but memorable part from Dick Van Dyke, P.L. Travers’ classic characters and story live for another generation of children. Even if it’s not quite as earth-shattering as Disney’s first-ever live-action film.

Image result for mary poppins returns poster

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” Movie Review

If anyone ever tells you that there’s no more fresh air to be found in the Spider-Man mythos, just point them in the direction of this movie. Either they’ll fall head over heels for the web-slinger all over again or there’s no hope left for them. This animated superhero film was released in theaters worldwide on December 14th, 2018. Made on a budget of $90 million, it has thus far grossed over $138 million at the international box office, breaking various records for animated openings in December and becoming Sony Animation’s biggest hit. It has also been the recipient of overwhelmingly positive responses from audiences and professionals, receiving some early nominations. It was even named the best film of the year by a film critics’ group in Utah. Conceived, produced and co-written by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, the same duo behind 21 Jump Street and The Lego Movie, the film was one of many projects leaked by the Sony hacks of November 2014. From the get-go all parties involved, including director Bob Perischetti, wanted to make a movie that was stylistically different from anything the medium had offered at that point. If all goes well, the studio hopes they can launch a series of animated Web-Slinger films in the future. Shameik Moore stars as Miles Morales, a young half-black, half-Puerto Rican teen living in modern-day Brooklyn. Bored by his new private school and frustrated by the relationship between his police officer father and criminal uncle, he gets pulled into a conflict involving the famous Spider-Man. During a battle, they accidentally open up a multiverse where several other Spider-People from various dimensions have leaked into his version of New York City. With limited time, Miles must get everyone back to their dimensions while discovering his own powers and avoiding the power of crime boss Wilson Fisk. To say that the current cinematic market is flooded to the brim with superheroes would be a massive understatement. In all seriousness, it took this movie several months to get on my radar because of that very reason. It shot up to the top of my December watchlist when I discovered that it was made by Lord and Miller. I absolutely adored their work with The Lego Movie, so I was curious to see what their whip-smart and hilarious stamp would like for a comic book superhero story. Especially because the new comic book-eque style of animation looked so different and original. I’m so, so happy to report that Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse exceeded all my expectations and is easily the best Marvel film Sony has produced in a long time. Perhaps better than the Sam Raimi trilogy, or Homecoming, or even the 90’s cartoon show, what makes Into the Spider-Verse so great is how well it understands the character of Spider-Man. Here, he’s not simply a person, but an idea. A mask for anyone to put on whenever they feel like they’re ready to conquer any big trials they may be facing. Whether it’s the affable Peter Parker or a smart but lonely Afro-Latina kid from Brooklyn, they all wrestle with the expectations of it all. As one person tells Miles, “I see this spark in you. It’s amazing. Whatever you choose to do with it, you’ll be great.” There’s a lot of weight that comes with wearing a costume, and to see Miles find the strength to do so is inspiring. Shameik Moore has been a rising star for a couple years now, and his performance as Miles Morales might just be the big break he needs. Through solely his voice, he carries all of the charisma he showed off in The Get Down and Dope, and gives off a relatable charm. Jake Johnson and Hailee Steinfeld also do great work as Peter B. Parker and Gwen Stacy, respectively. Though they’re kind of messy people, they turn into unconventional mentors for Miles while also realizing that they can’t do everything on their own. The other three Spider-People are Nicholas Cage, John Mulaney, and Kimiko Green as Spider-Man Noir, Spider-Ham, (No, that’s no joke) and SP//r, respectively. Cage is perfect in the role, delivering Bogart-eque lines with deadpan pleasure, while Mulany is hilarious as the cartoony version. Other voice actors include Leiv Schreiber, Brian Tyree Henry, Mahershala Ali, Kathryn Hahn, Lili Tomlin, Luna Lauren Velez, and Zoë Kravitz in roles as various comic book characters, both major and obscure. Meanwhile, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is just as technically astounding as the hype has made it appear. This may have some of the most unique and memorable animation of any movie in recent memory. Yes, it is mostly computer-animated, but it also blends it with comic book artwork, with certain textures on the screen at all times. It occasionally throws in a couple of other styles, such as anime and traditional 2-D, but they’re all in service to creating something that feels brand new. The blending of comic art and CG creates these gorgeous, vibrant colors for the city of New York, and makes the action scenes- particularly a jaw-dropping, kaleidoscopic finale -come to life, big exclamations and thought bubbles included. Daniel Pemberton, who gave a great soundtrack to last year’s underrated King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, composes the musical score for this film. He continues to expand his wings because, in many ways similar to Black Panther, this score infuses traditional orchestral beats with hip-hop tunes. It works to great effect, as a number of tracks that leave a lasting impression. This includes a leitmotif for one of the villains, which has rapid strings and percussion undercut by a menacing distorted roar. Rapper Post Malone also contributed heavily to the soundtrack, writing an original song called “Sunflower” with Swae Lee. It’s a catchy anthem whose lyrics are pertinent to the core of the film, urging its listener to believe that they’re special in some way. It plays during the beginning and end of the film, serving as a nice bookend to the insane story. What’s more is that there is an unexpected yet heartbreaking tribute to Stan Lee in the credits, as well as Spider-Man co-creator Steven Ditko. For those unaware, these two legends died earlier in the year. Lee obviously has his obligatory cameo in the movie, but the way the filmmakers paid homage was both moving and appropriate; a fitting tribute to what he had intended with the character(s). Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is a wildly inventive and fun take on a well-worn property that celebrates inclusion. Even with my high expectations, I’m still amazed with what Phil Lord, Christopher Miller, and all other parties were able to accomplish here. This sets a new bar for animated superhero movies, and I can’t wait to see what else Sony can offer in this department.

“The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie” Movie Review

Great. First Stephen Hawking. Then Stan Lee. And now Stephen Hillenburg, the creator of SpongeBob SquarePants. 2018 is becoming the new 2016, i.e. more and more beloved celebrities are dropping dead by the end of the year. I honestly think the best way to honor Hillenburg and his legacy would be to include this into my New Year’s resolution. This animated comedy was originally released in theaters around the world on November 19th, 2004. Although it still faced tough competition from The Incredibles, it managed to gross over $140 million at the box office against an overall budget of $30 million. Aided by generally positive responses, it also saw extensive marketing from establishments like 7-Eleven and Burger King, which outfitted various locations with huge inflatable figures of the titular character. Directed by Stephen Hillenburg, he had continuously rejected offers from Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon to make a feature-length film out of the beloved cartoon he created. After accepting in 2002, he assembled his regular show writers to come up with good ideas and storyboard in ways that were faithful to the show. By most accounts, this film was intended to be the series finale, but Nickelodeon ordered more episodes and continued on anyway, without Hillenburg’s involvement for a number of years. Set in the underwater city of Bikini Bottom, the titular frycook SpongeBob SquarePants becomes seriously upset when he doesn’t get to become the manager of the newly open Krusty Krab 2. Things get further complicated when Mr. Krabs, proprietor of the Kursty Krab, is accused and frozen in place for allegedly stealing King Neptune’s crown. Given 6 days to clear his name, SpongeBob and his best friend Patrick Star set out to the infamous Shell City to find the crown, all part of Plankton’s nefarious plan to steal the formula for the delicious and popular Krabby Patty. Full disclosure before going any further: The original SpongeBob cartoon was a defining part of my childhood. All of the early episodes from the first 3 seasons and this movie make up maybe a quarter of my memories growing up. In fact, a good number of those episodes I can quote and act out from front to back, with “Band Geeks” remaining my absolute favorite one out of all of them. Even though the newer seasons afterward were never nearly as good, I still watched them because I’m that big of a fan. All of that is a very long way of saying don’t really read this review if you’re looking for some sort of cold, objective take. The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie is still as fun, warm, and entertaining as an adult now as it was back when I was a kid. However, there are still parts of it that I can look at from a new perspective without getting misty-eyed or nostalgic too much. For one, the mythical hero arc that the primary story unfolds over is very traditional and well-worn. If you’re not familiar with this film and go in expecting an original, highbrow narrative with layered thematic interpretations, you’re going to severely let down. It takes everything in the manner of a fast-paced, ridiculously over-the-top comedy in the vein of the Farelly Brothers or Terry Gilliam or Abbott and Costello. If you’re a first-time viewer, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the animators (As well as fans) made or enjoyed it while high on bath salts or something. Virtually all of the cast members from the cartoon show reprise their roles here, and none of them have missed a single beat. Tom Kenny and Bill Fagerbakke are at the forefront as SpongeBob and Patrick and make one of the most lovably buffoonish buddy duos in recent memory. Their chemistry is absolutely on point, and while they may not be the brightest pair in Bikini Bottom, their everlasting enthusiasm makes their delivery of many lines priceless. “A bubble-blowing, double baby doesn’t belong out here. Man’s country!” My favorite (And most relatable) character from the show is still Squidward, and while his part here isn’t as big as I might’ve liked, his scenes leave a good impression. Rodger Bumpass as is hilariously grouchy and deadpan as ever, perhaps the one resident of town with much common sense to himself. He and Kenny also voice a couple of other roles in more subtle capacity, such as the French narrator. Scarlett Johannsson and Jeffrey Tambor are gamely as Princess Mindy and her father King Neptune. He is over-worried and loud about the most minute things while she constantly tries to help the two heroes in whatever way she can. Other new players include Alec Baldwin as a tall hitman tracking the protagonists to Shell City and David Hasselhoff as himself, playing a parody of his character from the show Baywatch. In all seriousness, growing up, I thought he was just some character made up; I swear that I’m not lying. On the filmmaking side of things, The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie fully embraces its weirdness and runs a marathon with it. A higher budget gives the animators more time to smooth things out in the film. While it includes show mainstays like bubbles for scene transition, the framerate and designs for characters looks a lot smoother than it usually does in the show. However, it remains traditionally animated, refusing to let computer animation take control. This works to the film’s benefit because the underwater world is extremely vibrant and colorful everywhere the characters roam. It also uses the storyboarded cinematography to its advantage, drawing out certain scenarios for comedic effect where other cartoons may just cut away. Gregory Narholz composes the instrumental film score, which is appropriate and highly reminiscent of the music from the show. Bendy guitar songs and woodwinds contribute to the huge personality found in Bikini Bottom. There are also a number of songs written specifically for the film, such “The Goofy Goober Song” (And a rock cover of it) and “Now That We’re Men.” They’re all delightful enough, but there are contributions from very weird artists, a deliberate choice by Hillenburg. The most memorable one among them is “Ocean Man” by the band Ween, which plays during the end credits. It’s surprisingly well-fitting for the story, and indeed feels like it was meant of be the end of the series. What I’m concerned about now is that now that he’s gone, what’s Nickelodeon going to do next? I’ve heard whispers that they might take the show off syndication or use the upcoming third movie as the real series finale. Whatever comes up, I agree with several other fans that it all should’ve probably just ended here. The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie is a gleefully zany and over-the-top comedy with nothing held back. Filled to the brim with beloved characters and callbacks to the show without ever trying to pander to any audience, this is certainly better than a lot of cartoon continuations in cinematic form. Say what you want about the recent seasons, there’s no denying the memories and devoted fans that Stephen Hillenburg created. I was overcome with nostalgia and sadness during the entirety of writing this review. Thank you for giving us the show about who lives in the pineapple under the sea, and may you rest in peace with all of the other titans we lost this month. If anyone needs me, I’ll probably be jellyfishing in my backyard for a little while.

“Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl” Movie Review

When I was younger, I legitimately wanted to become either a pirate or a superhero when I grew up. I didn’t care if it meant I would end up with a noose at my neck, this movie just made it look so cool. Produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, this historical fantasy adventure film was released around the world on July 9th, 2003, following a buzzy premiere at the Disneyland Resort. Against many odds, it went on to gross over $654 million at the worldwide box office, along with a number of positive reviews from critics and general audiences- many of whom were shocked at its quality. It went on to stay at the top of overseas markets for 7 weeks in a row and spawned one of Disney’s most popular and lucrative franchises in recent years. Directed by Gore Verbinski, the film was originally based off of the titular theme park ride in Disneyland. Screenwriters Terry Rossio and Ted Elliot took inspiration from pirate films made during the Golden Age of Hollywood, and constantly clashed heads with then-CEO Michael Eisner, who questioned whether the film would be better off in theaters or direct-to home video. Despite a relatively quick shooting schedule, the complicated motion capture technology and conflict between Verbinski and Industrial Lights and Magic led to grueling 18-hour days in post-production. It is also notable for being Disney’s first film production ever to receive a PG-13 rating. Orlando Bloom stars as Will Turner, a blacksmith and skilled swordsman with a huge heart of gold. Following a massive ceremony, his betrothed childhood love Elizabeth Swan, played by Keira Knightley, is kidnapped by a band of pirates with a mysterious condition. Without many options and virtually no help from the British Navy, he relies on the help of a free-spirited, hard-drinking, disgraced pirate named Captain Jack Sparrow, played by Johnny Depp. The two set off on the Seven Seas searching for the infamous ship The Black Pearl, all the while steering clear of the pursuing British Armada and dreading the ship’s haunted captain, Hector Barbossa. With this month in my New Year’s resolution, I just decided to go ahead and revisit a couple of movies I adored when I was younger, rather than something I had never seen before. (Trust me, I have plans for that in December) It’s always a fun process because then I can watch the film with new, older eyes that can help me appreciate aspects I had never really noticed before. Make no mistake, the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise got consistently worse as it went on, but the first 3 movies were extremely entertaining for what they were. And no matter what, The Curse of the Pearl remains the best of them all, launching a mighty career for its star and redefining what its studio could do. But for all intents and purposes, this film should not have any right to work nearly as well as it does. A PG-13-rated adventure based off of a fairly popular theme park ride from the same studio that gave us Mary Poppins and Pinnochio? Taken at face value, that whole idea just sounds like a Hollywood recipe for disaster, and many people in the industry were extremely pessimistic on its chances. And now, it has become one of the most iconic and defining film franchises of the early 21st Century. If you look at the landscape of blockbuster movies in the years since its release, especially those produced by Disney, the structure has become something of a template- for better or for worse. In all honesty, Keira Knightley and Orlando Bloom aren’t very memorable in their roles. Both are meant to be odes to characters in an Errol Flynn epic, but aren’t really able to break out of those molds. For what it’s worth, though, they are able to adapt to the comedic timing and wit found throughout. Geoffrey Rush is excellent and having a wonderful time as Captain Hector Barbossa, a pirate with a bitterness and love of apples. He chews the scenery as we gradually learn what’s going on with him and his crew on the titular ship, something that’s both slightly tragic and absurd. And yeah, you’ve got a supporting cast of Jack Davenport, Jonathan Pryce, Kevin McNally, Lee Arenberg, and Mackenzie Cook, but they all completely pale in comparison to Johnny Depp’s star-making performance as Captain Jack Sparrow. This is the second time this year where I find myself praising Depp in spite of his deeply troubling public issues, but it would be a lie to say that I wasn’t entranced by his iconic turn. Inspired in part by Keith Richards, (Who makes a delightful cameo in the third movie) he completely loses himself as a stumbling, alcoholic, yet unexpectedly cunning pirate who’s not devoid of a moral compass. His unusual movement and speech make for some very funny moments throughout the film. The first film also earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor, a very impressive feat considering everything else. Elsewhere, the technical side of The Curse of the Black Pearl show a surprisingly sufficient film with tons of bite. Shot by Dariusz Wolski, loves to use a number of sweeping wides and tracking shots during action scenes, really bringing out a sense of grand adventure in the viewer. It also helps that the film used real sail ships, costumes and weapons, meaning a lot of things were actually captured in-camera. The editing is a triple-job done by Craig Wood, Stephen Rivkin, and Arthur Schmidt, all of whom do good work on bringing the whole thing together. They cut together the action scenes and visual effects in gloriously satisfying manners, never skimping on any good details. It also knows how to drag out a good shot for comedic effect, as there are a lot of physical gags found in the movie. However, they could’ve definitely trimmed some fat off, as its runtime of 2 hours and 23 minutes feels bloated. Klaus Badelt, with a bit of help from Hans Zimmer, composes and conducts the instrumental film score. It remains one of the most memorable scores of any feature film in the last 20 years, with an iconic sound on par with any adventure flick you’ve seen from the 20th Century. The famous main theme, “He’s a Pirate,” serves as the backbone for the entire soundtrack, a booming anthem of brass, percussion, and orchestral strings. Other tracks are equally foreboding and jovial, trading something as dynamic as cello jigs for percussive, choral suspense. It’s a soundtrack I have listened to for many years, and will continue to do so. With memorable characters, impressive set pieces, and an immortal soundtrack, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl is a fun adventure with loads of swashbuckling charm and personality. You’d be hard-pressed to find a film in recent memory that defied more expectations than this one. Yes, it’s very indulgent and a little too long, but it still delivers after multiple rewatches and never loses sight of what it is.